Iglesia Mayor de San Pedro y San Pablo

San Fernando, Spain

Iglesia Mayor de San Pedro y San Pablo is located in the center of San Fernando, opposite the Church Square. Construction of the church began in 1756, replacing the small parish church of Santa María del Castillo de San Romualdo. It was consecrated in 1764 but was not completed until the early 19th century. Its primitive design is attributed to Alejandro Perdia although Torcuato Benjumeda is credited with its final appearance. It was built to satisfy the needs of San Fernando's growing population. Financing for its construction was raised by a tax on wine. Legend states, however, that an Englishman saw the unfinished state of the church and donated a large sum of money in spite of belonging to the Anglican Church himself. Its historical value is important, as it was here that deputies of the first Spanish Constituent Assembly were sworn in on September 24, 1810. A series of small offices within the building were historically used as meeting places for some guilds.

Architecture

Two architectural styles predominate the rectangular building: Late Baroque, especially the ornamental decorations around the various doors, and Neoclassicism in the upper sections of the towers topping the facade. Four bells which bear the names of the four Evangelists are situated in its two towers. The facade includes a flat bay with slightly arched lintel. The central nave is flanked by two aisles and there is a transept and a vestry which is at a slightly higher level than the rest of the church. The floor is of marble and there is an oyster stone plinth. The sacristy is behind the chancel. A hemispherical dome crowns the transept with ribbed vaults at the same height as the roof of the nave. Tuscan pillars supporting curved arches separate the aisles from the central nave.

Fittings

During restoration work in 1959, the main altar was adorned with paintings of Christ crucified with St Peter and St Paul on either side. The baptismal chapel in the first section of the nave is decorated with murals of the four Evangelists, dating to 1959. Other paintings in the church include Nuestra Señora del Rosario and San Miguel. Other various works of art include Holy Week processions in the city. The crypt, known as the cellar, contains the tombs of monks.

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Details

Founded: 1756
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva Nois (2 years ago)
Excelente, muchas tallas ,hay que visitarla en Semana Santa exponen todos los pasos del puerto
Vicente Luis Ajenjo (2 years ago)
Porque esta muy bien
RAFAEL DE ANDRES GARCIA (2 years ago)
Es muy grande. Está muy bien restaurada. Su altar es muy escueto, diria yo que minimalista, comparado con otras iglesias. Imponente.
vini derrent (2 years ago)
Interesting
Marc Harfouche (3 years ago)
Iglesia mayor de san Pedro y san Pablo is one of the most ancient churches in Andalucia. It has the major and the most famous images of the virgin Mary and Jesus Christ that are used for the passes in the semana Santa in San Fernando. It has also a special and old architectural design with a very big and ancient door. It has a relic of many Saints including San Josemaria Escriva founder of the Opus Dei. The church contains many cofradías (brotherhood).
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