Algarbes Necropolis

Tarifa, Spain

The Algarbes Necropolis is one of the most important archaeological ensembles of the province of Cádiz dating back to the Bronze Age (end of 3rd century BCE).

It has eight artificial caves in the shape of a circular chamber with entryways on different levels and two of them, nearly identical in symmetrical disposition, flank an ample corridor carved in sandstone. The latter correspond, due to the structure, to a big threshold related to megalithic burial grounds under a covered gallery.

The ten burial tombs may be divided in two groups. Those with a vertical entry, in the fashion of wells or grain storage silos, belong to the first group; and to the second, the vaulted ones with a side access may be adscribed. The archaeological site also houses a tomb that wholly differs from the former. It is an anthropomorphic tomb possibly assigned to a children burial.

The necropolis has been excavated in its totality by Carlos Posac Mon during the years 1967 to 1972 and the findings are of great value. Among these were found lots of ceramic urns. Pieces of bronze, ebony and gold have also been documented, as well as stone utensils, carved or polished, and ornamental objects such as pendants and perforated discs made from sea shells. Several lived in caves are found in the proximity and those were inhabited until 1930 approximately. An Islamic necropolis is also nearby.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Tarifa, Spain
See all sites in Tarifa

Details

Founded: 300-200 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Spain

More Information

www.tarifatrip.com

Rating

3.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marina Macho (5 months ago)
It was closed and there is hardly any information about the hours of this. I hope that one day it will be better since it belongs to the Junta de Andalucía.
Kathryn Mears (11 months ago)
Money has been spent on this. No doubt yours and mine. But it is never open to the public. Would be worth four stars for view alone. If you wish to visit, ask at the information centre near Torre de la Pena. They sometimes organise group visits. This centre is open on Thursday to Sunday and is itself worth a visit.
Cornelie Hordijk (12 months ago)
Nice walk around the necropolis, unfortunately the site itself is closed during the winter.
Maria Isabel Trujillo Ortiz (2 years ago)
No pudimos verla estaba cerrado y sin información
639523808sony Sony (2 years ago)
Estaba cerrado. Sin información sobre aperturas
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