Algarbes Necropolis

Tarifa, Spain

The Algarbes Necropolis is one of the most important archaeological ensembles of the province of Cádiz dating back to the Bronze Age (end of 3rd century BCE).

It has eight artificial caves in the shape of a circular chamber with entryways on different levels and two of them, nearly identical in symmetrical disposition, flank an ample corridor carved in sandstone. The latter correspond, due to the structure, to a big threshold related to megalithic burial grounds under a covered gallery.

The ten burial tombs may be divided in two groups. Those with a vertical entry, in the fashion of wells or grain storage silos, belong to the first group; and to the second, the vaulted ones with a side access may be adscribed. The archaeological site also houses a tomb that wholly differs from the former. It is an anthropomorphic tomb possibly assigned to a children burial.

The necropolis has been excavated in its totality by Carlos Posac Mon during the years 1967 to 1972 and the findings are of great value. Among these were found lots of ceramic urns. Pieces of bronze, ebony and gold have also been documented, as well as stone utensils, carved or polished, and ornamental objects such as pendants and perforated discs made from sea shells. Several lived in caves are found in the proximity and those were inhabited until 1930 approximately. An Islamic necropolis is also nearby.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Tarifa, Spain
See all sites in Tarifa

Details

Founded: 300-200 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Spain

More Information

www.tarifatrip.com

Rating

3.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

LACABRA AUDIOVISUAL (9 months ago)
Surrounding area very complete for the practice of enduro and mountain biking. If you follow the firewall that has light antennas along the way, you will find the mountain-bike descents.
Mon Jardâo (10 months ago)
A cool archeological site, which is very little known. Highly recommended place to visit and that has an incredible story behind it
emmanuelle CHAPELAT (12 months ago)
Everything is screened.
Mª Teresa Otero Alvarado (2 years ago)
After coming from Carteia and finding it closed despite indicating the hours that it was open, we could not see the necropolis either, will the Junta de Andalucía never realize the importance of good cultural management? It is pathetic to read the reviews of frustrated visitors after traveling from afar to see important sites closed, without information or with misinformation. What are these hicks already resigning?
Agustín Infante (2 years ago)
The truth is that you can not visit the necropolis, since it was closed, that at least they put a sign with the times and days ... But even so, the path is very nice and beautiful, although it is very difficult for the little ones, especially when it comes to principle ... If you like to walk and see beautiful spaces, this is your place.
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