Cathedral of St. Mary the Crowned

Gibraltar, United Kingdom

The original building of the current cathedral in Gibraltar was built during the Spanish period. Just after the reconquest of the city to the Moors, the main mosque was decreed to be stripped of its Islamic past and consecrated as the parish church. However, under the rule of the Catholic Monarchs, the old building was demolished and a new church was erected, in Gothic style. The cathedral's small courtyard is the remnant of the larger Moorish court of the mosque. The Catholic Monarchs' coat of arms was placed in the courtyard where it can still be seen today.

Due to the building being severely damaged during the 1779–1783 Great Siege, in 1790 the then Governor of Gibraltar Sir Robert Boyd offered to rebuild the cathedral. The reconstruction took place in 1810 and the opportunity was also taken to widen Main Street. The clock tower was added in 1820 and in 1931 restoration work was carried out on the cathedral and the current west façade erected to replace the poorer one built in 1810.

Until the 19th century, anyone who died in Gibraltar had the right to be buried under the cathedral floor. Bishops are buried in a crypt beneath the statue of Our Lady of Europe.

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Details

Founded: 1810
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

H Stephens (3 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful church, with daily evening masses. Enhanced my holiday immensely
Gerry R (3 years ago)
A beautiful place of peace to visit I love gin and its vibrant faith life... our lady of Europe bless Europe and reconvert her
AK P (3 years ago)
Beautiful and historic. Several daily Masses.
Martin Lack (4 years ago)
Visit in the afternoon to see it at its best.
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