Gibraltar Botanic Gardens

Gibraltar, United Kingdom

In 1816 the Botanical Gardens were commissioned by the British Governor of Gibraltar General George Don. It was his intention that the soldiers stationed in the fortress would have a pleasant recreational area to enjoy when off duty, and so inhabitants could enjoy the air protected from the extreme heat of the sun.

The gardens were resurrected in 1991 by an external company when it was realised that since the 1970s they had fallen into a poor state. Three years later the gardens had the addition of a zoo: the Alameda Wildlife Conservation Park.

In 2001 a bronze sculpture of James Joyce's Molly Bloom was installed in the gardens. This running figure was commissioned from Jon Searle to celebrate the bicentenary of the Gibraltar Chronicle in 2001.

The Eliott Memorial

General Don had commissioned a memorial of George Augustus Eliott, 1st Baron Heathfield in 1815, which did not materialise in the form initially requested. A colossal statue of General Eliot, carved from the bowsprit of the Spanish ship San Juan Nepomuceno, taken at the Battle of Trafalgar was first created. That statue was taken to the Governor's residence, The Convent, where it stands today, being replaced by the present bronze bust in 1858. This statue is guarded for four 18th-century howitzers.

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    Founded: 1816
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    4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Carlton Hall (12 months ago)
    We visited the gardens whilst on a cruise ship stop. We are not big fans of Gibraltar, so to find this hidden gem was brilliant. Very quiet away from all the crowds. Very well kept gardens, highly recommended. A fair walk from the cruise terminal though.
    Annie Fang (12 months ago)
    Really enjoyed the atmosphere there. Easy to get to, and has got lots of different species of greens to immerse ourselves into. It has also got wildlife reserve and a few other facilities. Good for a casual stroll.
    gabriela ionescu (13 months ago)
    A nice getaway from the city buzz. Luxurious vegetation a great place to stroll and have a snack. Some really great facilities for kids soft play and a small zoo
    Julie-ann Valentine (14 months ago)
    It's a nice area to walk around. The birds are singing and the fragrance from the flowers is lovely. We loved the waterfalls and the displays of bee hotels and other things. There is a wildlife park within the gardens but we did not have time to visit it.
    Alexandra Stroescu (15 months ago)
    Small, not super informative, but you can hide from the heat there. Liked that they had a tiny exotic animal rescue zoo - forbidden pets or exotic animals in distress which are found are taken care of here. They seem to have concerts and other events in the gardens.
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