Saint Michael's Cave is a series, or network of caves made of limestone, which are found on the Rock of Gibraltar. St Michaels Cave is located on what is called the Upper Rock, inside the Upper Rock Nature Reserve of Gibraltar.

The cave was created by the slow seepage of rainwater through the rock, which turned into a carbonic acid solution that actually dissolved the rocks of the cave. The process made the tiny cracks of the geological faults of Gibraltar grow into very long passages and deep caverns over the thousands of years of its formation. The Cathedral Cave, part of St Michaels cave was at one time thought to be bottomless, and was long spoken of in the legends of Gibraltar.

The Rock of Gibraltar has long been considered to be one of the pillars of Hercules, and this too adds to the mystique and legend, and since it hosted the cave, the caverns themselves were thought to be the Gates to Hades, or Hell, an entryway to the Underworld where the dead rested.

In the latter part of 1974, proof that the cave was known to and used by prehistoric men was made clear with the finding of art on the cave walls, showing an ibex drawn there that was traced to the Solutrean period (dating the cave art to about 15-20 thousand years ago), but later, two Neanderthal skulls that were found in Gibraltar tell us that this cave could have been discovered and used as early as 40,000 BC.

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    Founded: 40,000 BCE
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    User Reviews

    robert sloan (9 months ago)
    absolutely fantastic would love to see a concert in here,a natural wonderland, completely forgot about the monkeys which was the main reason for coming up here
    Brennan Shrider (11 months ago)
    An impressive addition to this vacation-style island. This cave goes big and does not underwhelm with the stalac-X on either the floor or ceiling (cant remember the difference).
    H S (11 months ago)
    It's good. Do yourself a favor and take the taxi tour. Only crazy people walk up to the top of the Rock. It is decently priced and includes entrance into key landmarks. You'll see plenty of monkeys and they may jump on you! I got jumped by a couple of monkeys...at the same time. ??? Animals know animal-lovers!
    Ionut (11 months ago)
    The spectacular St. Michael's Cave it's situated at 350m above sea level and descends into the Rock of Gibraltar. Over thousands of years, during this process, small cracks formed in the Rock turned into passages and caves where soldiers took refuge during wars.
    Tony Rees (13 months ago)
    Brilliant place, not many visitors so you can stand and take the whole place in. Lighting and soundtrack adds to the atmosphere.
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