Saint Michael's Cave is a series, or network of caves made of limestone, which are found on the Rock of Gibraltar. St Michaels Cave is located on what is called the Upper Rock, inside the Upper Rock Nature Reserve of Gibraltar.

The cave was created by the slow seepage of rainwater through the rock, which turned into a carbonic acid solution that actually dissolved the rocks of the cave. The process made the tiny cracks of the geological faults of Gibraltar grow into very long passages and deep caverns over the thousands of years of its formation. The Cathedral Cave, part of St Michaels cave was at one time thought to be bottomless, and was long spoken of in the legends of Gibraltar.

The Rock of Gibraltar has long been considered to be one of the pillars of Hercules, and this too adds to the mystique and legend, and since it hosted the cave, the caverns themselves were thought to be the Gates to Hades, or Hell, an entryway to the Underworld where the dead rested.

In the latter part of 1974, proof that the cave was known to and used by prehistoric men was made clear with the finding of art on the cave walls, showing an ibex drawn there that was traced to the Solutrean period (dating the cave art to about 15-20 thousand years ago), but later, two Neanderthal skulls that were found in Gibraltar tell us that this cave could have been discovered and used as early as 40,000 BC.

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    Founded: 40,000 BCE
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    User Reviews

    cedric lee (2 years ago)
    Definitely one of the amazing places on earth. A cave in the side of the rock of Gibraltar. They have added lights and music which enhance the sights. People have weddings and concerts here! Wow!
    Catherine Cowlishaw (2 years ago)
    Caves are absolutely breathtaking, although not sure about the constant colour changing and music - doesn't seem to do the grandeur of it all justice. One warning - staff in the café there are surly, rude and seemed to ignore a lot of customers. Whilst waiting to order two other couples gave up as the female staff member completely ignored them, and then after several attempts we also have up and left!
    Patricia Cockburn (2 years ago)
    Amazing. So glad I chose this tour. Our bus driver, Dave, was a fount of knowledge and so funny. Loved the Barbary Apes too. Back on board for mid morning coffee
    carol Joines (2 years ago)
    After all I had heard about the Barbary apes I was concerned about stepping foot outside the vehicle.These concerns were unfounded,I did not carry a bag with me just in case. The limestone caves are a cool retreat from the outside heat .This is apparently where the Arch angel Micheal is said to have appeared. The cave is well lit and they even hold concerts here.Beautiful colours under the lights.Easy to move around underfoot.
    Kereth (2 years ago)
    This is a great spot to enjoy nature. The cave is extensive and easy to navigate (no crawling!) This venue is used for concerts, so has colorful lighting. Just outside the gates you will find Barbary macaques (monkeys!) This is the only European country where you will find monkeys in the wild!
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