The exact building date of Castel Gavone ('Castrum Govonis'), the former seat of the Del Carretto Marquisses, is still unknown. The castle rises on a huge, steep curvilinear rampart on top of the Becchignolo hill.

The castle was allegedly built by Enrico II in 1181 on remains of previous defensive structures. It was certainly fortified in 1292. Destroyed during the struggles with Genoa, it was rebuilt by Giovanni I in 1451-1452, along with the Borgo walls.

It underwent further modifications until 1715 when it was largely dismantled by the Genoese who wanted to destroy the symbol of their ancient enemy after their conquest of the Marquisate. Only some of the retaining side-walls were spared in addition to the very famous Diamond Tower (today the best-preserved structure). The Tower, which has a curved triangular base, was built using diamond-faceted squared stones. It faces south with its acute edge resembling the bow of a ship. It is an excellent example of late medieval military architecture. Many of the original materials such as beams, stones and columns, were later used to build churches, gates and houses.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Pöhlig (13 months ago)
Good view
Davide Brustia (15 months ago)
Everything around this castle is magic! Must go
Federica C (2 years ago)
Beautiful sight of the sea and the mountain and villages surrounding. Fascinating atmosphere like a jump on the past. Nice walks. Ideal with kids
Marcella Ferri (2 years ago)
Great experience! Visit in summer by night or during the day on special Sundays over the year. Have just done the visit by night. Pure magic packed with interesting historical anecdotes. A must!
Karla Hour (2 years ago)
If you can hike up 30 minutes. You can do this. As every one said the castle is closed. But it has summer gude tours at night. I am looking forward for August 17th night tour. And up date my experience again. The view and the great near by restaurant ( at night, don't miss this specialty dishes! ) it self was worth the trip. Italian does not put up ads at all. As if they try not to create too many visitors for the peaceful life styles. I do not blame them. I too, prefer not need reservation for food. :)
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