Bottarvegården

Burgsvik, Sweden

Bottarvegården is an open-air museum exhibiting the countryside living in the 19th century. The main building was built in 1844 an other buildings date also from the late 1800s. Interiors and furnitures are well-preserved. There is also a café and giftshop. Bottarvegården is open in summer season.

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Details

Founded: 1844
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

www.bottarve.se

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Oskar Haeger (4 months ago)
Fin gård och intressanta faktaskyltar där du kan lära dig om Gotlands historia med avseende på hur man levde och byggde sina gårdar. FInns även djur att titta på samt en lekplats för barnen att springa av sig. Maten var dock inte någon höjdare. Kanske beroende på att vi kom "off season", men det var micromat och tämligen oinspirerat. Både mat och de som serverade. Kanske hade vi bara otur den dagen vi var där. Jag rekommenderar ändå ett besök, men ha inte för höga förhoppningar kring mat. I bästa fall blir ni positivt överraskade.
Jessica Palmgren (5 months ago)
Så mysigt och vackert ställe! Fin gammal gotländsk museigård med café där man kan välja att sitta ute i den fina trädgården eller inomhus. Butik, en rolig lekplats samt lite djur som barn brukar uppskatta mycket att titta på. Ett givet besök varje sommar!
Anders Björklund (6 months ago)
Mysigt för familjer med yngre barn. Stor lekplats, djur man kan mata och sist men inte minst fika/enklare mat i fin historisk miljö.
Jonathan Richardson (6 months ago)
Good value
Amir Benyovitch (2 years ago)
A very Nice garden with many games and things for kids to do and even some animals to look. Very nice place to spend a few hours with small kids. There is also quite good caffe in this place which serve also lunch.
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