Hejde Church is a medieval Lutheran church in Hejde on the island of Gotland. The church tower and the nave are the oldest parts of Hejde Church, dating from the middle of the 13th century. The choir is about a century later and replaced an earlier and smaller Romanesque choir. Plans to also enlarge the nave and tower were never executed. The sacristy dates from 1795.

The church has two decorated entrance portals on the south façade. Of these, the choir portal is considered one of the most peculiar on Gotland. The church tower is decorated with side galleries to the south and north, and has two openings for the church bells, each divided by colonnettes, on every side. Internally, the church roof is supported by rib vaults, which is unusual for churches on Gotland. Frescos from the 13th and 14th century decorate the walls, and in the windows medieval stained glass has been preserved (probably dating from the second half of the 14th century).

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Address

563, Hejde, Sweden
See all sites in Hejde

Details

Founded: c. 1250
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matilda Wetterlund (8 months ago)
Jonathan Richardson (13 months ago)
Noisy but an excellent alarm!!
Ulrika Qvarnstedt (13 months ago)
En vacker och lagom stor kyrka där man ser bra fram till koret från i stort sett alla sittplatser. Kyrkan har hörslinga för hörselskadade och har en bra entre från baksidan för rullstolar.
Bengt Ove Lindroth (19 months ago)
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