Kamieniec Castle

Odrzykoń, Poland

The original small castle on the site of Kamieniec Castle was erected before the mid-14th century, during the reign of Casimir the Great. It was a royal property handed over to the management of burgrave Mikołaj. 

In the fifteenth century the descendants of Klemens from Moskorzewo (Pilawici family) took over the name Kamienieccy, thus emphasizing the role of the castle as the main seat of the family. Despite the temporary, partial loss of the family’s significance in the first half of the fifteenth century, they carried out another expansion, enlarging Kamieniec by a western ward. Further works on the extension of the castle were made in the second half of the 15th century and at the turn of the 15th and 16th centuries.   

In 1530, the middle castle together with the eastern Korczyn Ward became the property of the Boners, and later the Firlej family. On the other hand, the upper castle and western ward were owned by Sienieńscy, Stadniccy and Skotniccy families. This resulted in the formation of two equal residences, and at the same time complicated life in the castle and provoked the quarrels between the inhabitants, mainly due to the necessity of using the same parts od castle, especially the eastern gate and well on the western ward. At the beginning of the 17th century, Jan Skotnicki rebuilt Kamieniec after collapsing the corner of the upper castle, but in revenge for teasing his neighbors, he rebuilt the roof in such a way that he raining the rainwater to the Firlejs courtyard. This was the reason for the long dispute between Skotnicki and Firlej, immortalized in Aleksander Fredro’s comedy. The end of their long-standing conflicts, put only a marriage concluded in 1638 by the voivode Mikołaj Firlej with the castellan Zofia Skotnicka.   In 1657, the castle was conquered and destroyed by the army of George II Rákóczi. It was later partially rebuilt, but eventually in the eighteenth century fell into disrepair. In the 19th century, unfortunately, part of the walls were dismantled in order to acquire building material for the construction of a church and monastery in Krosno.

Fragments of the upper and middle castle walls and part of the perimeter walls of the lower ward have survived to this day. The eastern part is better preserved and there is a small museum decorated by the enthusiast of the castle and collector Andrzej Kołder. Among the exhibits are militaria from the former arsenal of the castle and souvenirs of subsequent owners.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

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