Castro de Elviña

A Coruña, Spain

Castro de Elviña is a remnant of a Celtic military structure in A Coruña. It was in use from the 3rd century BCE until 4th century CE.

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Founded: 300-200 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cabo “EA1BC” Tenreiro (4 months ago)
One of the best, in the history of Coruña, next to the Torre de Hèrcules. They should give more publicity and attention to this beautiful place. Access can be improved.
Iván Guitart (4 months ago)
Inaccesible tanto a coche como a pie, no se si será algo eventual por reforma o si será siempre así. Una lástima
jorge calvo (4 months ago)
I have been many years ago, when I was still almost unexcavated; I have gone today, but it is not open at any time. You must register to visit it. I give 3 stars because the schedules and information here are not up to date.
Pedro Palomeque Ramirez (4 months ago)
A pity that it is not open to the public all day. From the road you can see slightly.
Julio Lorente (5 months ago)
The guided visit to the castro is well worth it, much less known and promoted than the historical and archaeological value of the site deserves. The Castro is in a quiet place from which you can see La Coruña. The visit is very complete and helps you to recognize and interpret the different structures and to imagine what life could be like in the fort and the relationship with Carthaginians and Romans during the time it was inhabited.
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