Top Historic Sights in Vukovar, Croatia

Explore the historic highlights of Vukovar

Church of St. Nicholas

Church of St Nicholas is a Serbian Orthodox church and one of the oldest baroque buildings of the Serb community north of the Sava River. Present church was built in the period from 1733 till 1737. The church is built on location of old wooden church from 1690. The church was closed and looted during the World War II (1941-1942), and in 1991 interior of the church was dynamited by the local Croatian armed units in the ci ...
Founded: 1733-1737 | Location: Vukovar, Croatia

Eltz Manor

In 1736, Philipp Karl von Eltz-Kempenich (1665–1743), the Archchancellor of the Holy Roman Empire and Prince-Archbishop of Mainz, purchased a Vukovar manor in Syrmia, in the eastern Kingdom of Slavonia, then part of the Habsburg Monarchy ruled by Emperor Charles VI. The palace was originally built between 1749 and 1751 by the Archchancellor"s descendants of the German Catholic noble House of Eltz and ...
Founded: 1749 | Location: Vukovar, Croatia

Church of Saints Philip and James

The Church of Saints Philip and James was built from 1723 till 1732, when it was blessed by Marko Dragojević. In 1897 it was expanded according to the plans of Franz Langerberg and later Richard Jordan. In 1911 it was successfully painted with fresco paintings.
Founded: 1723-1732 | Location: Vukovar, Croatia

Dudik Memorial Park

Dudik Memorial Park site is dedicated to 455 individuals who were executed by the authorities of the Independent State of Croatia during the World War II in Yugoslavia. In 1945 mortal remains of 384 victims were exhumed and placed in the common ossuary dedicated to the victims of Dudik, fallen soldiers of the 5th Vojvodina Brigade of the 36th Vojvodina Division and the Red Army soldiers who fought within the Vukovar area ...
Founded: 1945 | Location: Vukovar, Croatia

Vučedol Culture Museum

The Vučedol archaeological site is located on the right bank of the Danube River. Both sides along the pass towards the Danube make up the archaeological site, on the left is the Karasović Vineyard, and on the right is a large complex which include the Streim Vineyard, the Streim Cornfield and artificially separated from them is a little plateau known as Gradac, which with later excavations was confirmed as being the me ...
Founded: 2013 | Location: Vukovar, Croatia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.