Dudik Memorial Park

Vukovar, Croatia

Dudik Memorial Park site is dedicated to 455 individuals who were executed by the authorities of the Independent State of Croatia during the World War II in Yugoslavia.

In 1945 mortal remains of 384 victims were exhumed and placed in the common ossuary dedicated to the victims of Dudik, fallen soldiers of the 5th Vojvodina Brigade of the 36th Vojvodina Division and the Red Army soldiers who fought within the Vukovar area. Most of the victims at the Dudik were Yugoslav Partisan and ethnic Serbs from modern day Croatia and from Inđija, Stara Pazova, Ruma, Šid, Sremska Mitrovica and Irig in Serbia who were target of persecution of Serbs in the Independent State of Croatia.

In 1973 Park was classified as a monument of cultural importance. Monument at the Dudik Memorial, built from 1978 to 1980, is designed by Bogdan Bogdanović.

Dudik Memorial Park was devastated during the Croatian War of Independence, and in the post war years was a mined area. Prior to its reconstruction Vukovar town authorities used it as football field causing criticism among antifascist and Serb minority organizations. Monuments and park reconstruction began in 2015 and was completed in 2016.

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Details

Founded: 1945
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Davidson (10 months ago)
Stanislav Nikolic (11 months ago)
Peaceful site and place for thinking about are past.
Ano Nimni (2 years ago)
Definitly one of the stangest monuments out there, but it makes it even more special.
Ivan Lončarević (3 years ago)
Bogdanovic
Claire F (3 years ago)
Stunning and moving monument to remember the antifascists and revolutionaries who were executed in Vukovar during WWII. Bogdan Bogdanović’s surrealist style draws from mythology and regional cultural heritage to create a site that draws you in, even as it is embedded into its surroundings to the point of almost blending in— with the tall grasses nearly overtaking the boats in the field and pigeons making homes in the upper segments of the conic structures. When I was there at dusk, a soccer game was winding down at a neighboring field. The quotidian sounds of children playing melted into the beams of the setting sun dappling the stones. The past standing vigilant guard over the future.
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