Church of St. Nicholas

Vukovar, Croatia

Church of St Nicholas is a Serbian Orthodox church and one of the oldest baroque buildings of the Serb community north of the Sava River.

Present church was built in the period from 1733 till 1737. The church is built on location of old wooden church from 1690. The church was closed and looted during the World War II (1941-1942), and in 1991 interior of the church was dynamited by the local Croatian armed units in the city. Of the total 1991 pre-war internal inventory there is kept only 39 icons, 3 gospels and part of archive and church vessels. Reconstruction of external damage is completed, while the restoration of the interior is still in progress.

St Nicholas is nave building with an apse and bell tower at the main facade. The main front in the central part is slightly accentuated, processed by single and doubled pilasters, cornices and attic wavy line on the edges of a classicist vases. Slender tower that emphasize edge pilasters ending baroque arches with the lantern. Vaulted nave of the church is divided into four bays, which are separated by a wide archivolts resting on Ionic capitals, while the semi-dome-vaulted sanctuary. The bell tower, which was completed in 1767, is 37 meters high.

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Founded: 1733-1737
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Ведран Петровић (16 months ago)
The Vukovar cathedral church of Saint Father Nikolai was built from 1733 to 1737, and the temple on Good Water dedicated to the Holy Mother Paraskeva was built in the early 19th century from 1808 to 1811. At the beginning of the 19th century, Vukovar Serbs rented four cadastral acres of land from Count Emerik Elc in the Adica Forest, for which until 1848 the Count paid two ducats a year. On this land, at the source of medicinal water, a church was erected dedicated to the Reverend Mother Paraskeva, which was built between 1808 and 1811 as a one-nave building in the Baroque style. Before the Second World War, the church was restored by the Vukovar merchant Paja Uglješić, and after the war it was painted and desecrated several times. It was also rebuilt in 1982, and then in the last war a new destruction would occur when its interior was damaged. Since 1996, by the decision of the then bishop of Lucian, the Bishop of Osijek and Baranja, it became a parochial church and soon, three years later, was rebuilt externally and internally. Also, this temple is painted with frescoes on canvas consecrated on August 8, 2008, on the feast day of the Holy Martyr Paraskeva ...
Ведран Петровић (16 months ago)
The Vukovar cathedral church of Saint Father Nikolai was built from 1733 to 1737, and the temple on Good Water dedicated to the Holy Mother Paraskeva was built in the early 19th century from 1808 to 1811. At the beginning of the 19th century, Vukovar Serbs rented four cadastral acres of land from Count Emerik Elc in the Adica Forest, for which until 1848 the Count paid two ducats a year. On this land, at the source of medicinal water, a church was erected dedicated to the Reverend Mother Paraskeva, which was built between 1808 and 1811 as a one-nave building in the Baroque style. Before the Second World War, the church was restored by the Vukovar merchant Paja Uglješić, and after the war it was painted and desecrated several times. It was also rebuilt in 1982, and then in the last war a new destruction would occur when its interior was damaged. Since 1996, by the decision of the then bishop of Lucian, the Bishop of Osijek and Baranja, it became a parochial church and soon, three years later, was rebuilt externally and internally. Also, this temple is painted with frescoes on canvas consecrated on August 8, 2008, on the feast day of the Holy Martyr Paraskeva ...
Renata Mandić (18 months ago)
delightfully
Renata Mandić (18 months ago)
delightfully
slobodan pacic (2 years ago)
An important part of the history of the city and its present life.
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