Vučedol Culture Museum

Vukovar, Croatia

The Vučedol archaeological site is located on the right bank of the Danube River. Both sides along the pass towards the Danube make up the archaeological site, on the left is the Karasović Vineyard, and on the right is a large complex which include the Streim Vineyard, the Streim Cornfield and artificially separated from them is a little plateau known as Gradac, which with later excavations was confirmed as being the metallurgical and cult centre of the site. Vučedol is one of the most significant archaeological sites in Europe.

The first investigations of the site date back to 1897. This attractive location was first inhabited in about 6,000 B.C. at the time of the first farmers, and more or less it was inhabited intensively through the whole of prehistory. The period between 3,350 – 2,300 B.C. was the most intensive period of its existence and in that period it was undoubtedly the most significant European centre. Since this was also the time of the early settlements of Troy (Troy I and II) many analogies can also be found with the archaeological material from Vučedol. More precisely, we can also characterise Vučedol as the European Troy by its contemporaneousness, but even more so by the continental significance of the site and its finds.

Archaeological excavations to date are able to very precisely reconstruct the daily life and customs of four cultural phenomena which in that time swept through Vučedol (Baden, Kostolac, Vučedol and Vinkovci). It was a turbulent time of the immigration of the first Indo-Europeans and their relationship with the natives, the blending of material cultures and religions. Each of the above-mentioned cultures had its own interesting separate destiny in Vučedol, however the most detailed one able to be reconstructed is the Vučedol which also gave its name to this site. Vučedol reached a real peak in the intensity of settlement right in the period of the Vučedol Culture (3,000 – 2,500 B.C.). Excavations show that the culture was literally born in this area and that for a long time it was its most significant centre. This cultural phenomenon at its peak completely or partially covered 14 of today’s European countries – the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Slovenia, Italy, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Albania and one settlement has even been registered in Eastern Greece.

Vučedol Culture Museum was established in 2013 as a national museum. This is the result of many years of efforts in Vučedol because its character is classified in the first row of archaeological parks and entered in the archaeological map of this part of Europe.

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Details

Founded: 2013
Category: Museums in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Duras (3 months ago)
Excellent museum. Well worth a visit. Family ticket is cheap. Only 8euro.
Mirela Marovic Omerzu (3 months ago)
Place to visit when in eastern parts of Croatia. Museum itself is a beautiful modern building, the story about Vucedol culture is very well told and presented. It’s a fun place for the whole family. We enjoyed the visit very much
Krešimir Kerek (3 months ago)
Great building, great exhibition, lousy maintenance and lazy personnel.
The Real True Duck (10 months ago)
Very lovely museum, the tour guides explain everything thoroughly and are easy to understand. They have lots of beautiful archeological items. No complaints.
advaitacarya das (11 months ago)
Great concept to form a museum on the bank of the river Dunav below the vineyards of the area. Content and flow of the museum is lacking dynamic and moves in predictable line without creative spikes. Something to look into it is nearby food options. If you are in the area don't miss out on this architectural masterpiece.
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