Top Historic Sights in Paide, Estonia

Explore the historic highlights of Paide

Paide Castle

The construction of Paide order castle was started in 1265 under the leadership of Konrad von Mandern. The original tower of Tall Hermann was octagonal with the height of over 30 meters and the thickness of the walls of about 3 meters. At the beginning of the Livonian War the Russians repeatedly besieged Paide, but only in 1573 they finally managed to invade Paide. After that it changed hands several times until the Swed ...
Founded: 1265 | Location: Paide, Estonia

Paide Church

The town of Paide has had a church since the 13th century. The first churches were probably built of wood. In 1767 started the construction of a new stone church and it was consecrated in 1786. On 10 May 1845, the church was destroyed in a fire. During the years 1847-1848, a new, Neo-classicistic building with neo-baroque elements was constructed by the design of G. Mühlenhausen. The church of Paide is unique among ...
Founded: 1847-1848 | Location: Paide, Estonia

Järvamaa Museum

Järvamaa Museum was found in 1905. The former veterinary clinic in Paide Lembitu park was adjusted for museum building in 1950s. The permanent exhibition about the county was opened in 1956. Nowadays museum still functions in the same building. You can visit Järvamaa museum in Paide from Tuesday till Saturday. Reference: Visit Estonia
Founded: 1905 | Location: Paide, Estonia

Eivere Manor

Eivere estate (Eyefer) was first mentioned in 1552. The current manor house was built around 1912 in an eclectic style, mixing neo-Gothic and Art Nouveau elements. Today it functions as a hotel.
Founded: 1912 | Location: Paide, Estonia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.