Paide Church

Paide, Estonia

The town of Paide has had a church since the 13th century. The first churches were probably built of wood. In 1767 started the construction of a new stone church and it was consecrated in 1786.

On 10 May 1845, the church was destroyed in a fire. During the years 1847-1848, a new, Neo-classicistic building with neo-baroque elements was constructed by the design of G. Mühlenhausen. The church of Paide is unique among the other churches in Estonia for its tower, which is not sited at the west ends as it traditionally is, but in the center of the church, on the southern side. The reason is that the new church and tower were built on the old basement.

The church of Paide is open advance bookings only.

Reference: Paide.ee

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Address

Keskväljak 1, Paide, Estonia
See all sites in Paide

Details

Founded: 1847-1848
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

www.visitestonia.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leonid Romanov (3 years ago)
An interesting and sad history of the church, even the emperor of Russia himself participated in donations for the construction. There are a lot of old houses around the church, and on each of them there are plaques with their stories. It is a pity that the parsonage building of the church manor was sold to private hands and greatly rebuilt.
Üllar Pärnmets (4 years ago)
Beautiful
Janek Koltsov (5 years ago)
Fine, beautiful church every full hour informs the clock.
Timo Petmanson (5 years ago)
Found no god there
Rumarak (5 years ago)
Regular and not too of a impressive building
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