The town of Paide has had a church since the 13th century. The first churches were probably built of wood. In 1767 started the construction of a new stone church and it was consecrated in 1786.

On 10 May 1845, the church was destroyed in a fire. During the years 1847-1848, a new, Neo-classicistic building with neo-baroque elements was constructed by the design of G. Mühlenhausen. The church of Paide is unique among the other churches in Estonia for its tower, which is not sited at the west ends as it traditionally is, but in the center of the church, on the southern side. The reason is that the new church and tower were built on the old basement.

The church of Paide is open advance bookings only.

Reference: Paide.ee

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Address

Keskväljak 1, Paide, Estonia
See all sites in Paide

Details

Founded: 1847-1848
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lihtsalt Mina (4 months ago)
Väga hingekosutav kogemus...
Priit Adler (16 months ago)
Keskne ehitis
ElitZy (2 years ago)
Es un bonito lugar
Third EFX (3 years ago)
Anatoly Ko (6 years ago)
Keskväljak 1, Paide, Järvamaa, 58.887577, 25.570163 ‎ 58° 53' 15.28", 25° 34' 12.59" Церковь существовала в Пайде уже с 13 века, сначала в орденском городище, а затем в нижней части города возле центральной площади. В 1845 году церковь, освященная лишь в 1786 году, была уничтожена пожаром. Благодаря усердной поддержке жителей города в 1847-1848 годах было построено новое здание в стиле позднего классицизма с необарочными элементами, которое сохранилось до наших дней. Церковь Святого Креста в Пайде – самобытное сооружение среди эстонских церквей, так как ее башня расположена не в западной части, а в центре, в южной части здания.
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