Järvamaa Museum

Paide, Estonia

Järvamaa Museum was found in 1905. The former veterinary clinic in Paide Lembitu park was adjusted for museum building in 1950s. The permanent exhibition about the county was opened in 1956. Nowadays museum still functions in the same building. You can visit Järvamaa museum in Paide from Tuesday till Saturday.

Reference: Visit Estonia

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Details

Founded: 1905
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristel Orav (2 years ago)
Väga mitmekülgsed näitused-väljapanekud. Sõbralikud ja teadjad töötajad.
Ants Sardis (2 years ago)
Huvitav.
Mikk Jõesaar (2 years ago)
Hunt ja karu on Lahedad!
Priit Adler (2 years ago)
Tubli boss
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Lembitu pst 5, Paide linn, Järvamaa 58.888041, 25.561897‎ 58° 53' 16.95", 25° 33' 42.83" Музей Ярвамаа - один из стареших музеев в уезде. Музей основан в 1905 году по инициативе Общества Охраны Древности. За свою столетнюю историю музей собрал коллецию в 75 000 экспонатов. Зкспозиция музея формируется согласно тематическим комнатам: железный век, средневековье, прошлый век , современность и т.д. Содержание экспозиции меняется раз в 3-4 месяца. Постоянная экспозиция об уезде была открыта в 1956 году. Бриллиантом постоянной экспозиции является внутреннее убранство старой аптеки Пайде из 200 предметов. Музей проводит различные обучающие программы и семинары. Музей Ярвамаа можно посетить со вторника по пятницу.
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