The construction of Paide order castle was started in 1265 under the leadership of Konrad von Mandern. The original tower of Tall Hermann was octagonal with the height of over 30 meters and the thickness of the walls of about 3 meters.

At the beginning of the Livonian War the Russians repeatedly besieged Paide, but only in 1573 they finally managed to invade Paide. After that it changed hands several times until the Swedes got it in 1608. In 1638 they removed Paide from the list of castles.

The rampart tower and castle ruins were first conserved at the end of 19th century. In 1913 a park was planted on the hill. In 1941 Soviet soldiers destroyed the rampart tower,– the symbol of both Paide and Järva County. To celebrate the 650th anniversary of the St. George's Night uprising the tower was restored in 1993. Today it houses a museum.

References: Aviastar.org, Paide Tourism Information

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