Top Historic Sights in Worms, Germany

Explore the historic highlights of Worms

Worms Cathedral

The Cathedral of St. Peter (Wormser Dom, Worms Cathedral) is a basilica with four round towers, two large domes, and a choir at each end. The interior is built in red sandstone. Today, the Wormser Dom is a Catholic parish church, honoured with the title of 'Minor Basilica'. Only the ground plan and the lower part of the western towers belong to the original building consecrated in 1110. The remainder was mostly ...
Founded: 1110 | Location: Worms, Germany

Worms Jewish Cemetery

The Jewish Cemetery in Worms is usually called the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe. The Jewish community of Worms was established by the early eleventh century, and the oldest tombstone still legible dates from 1058/59. The cemetery was closed in 1911, when a new cemetery was inaugurated. Some family burials continued until the late 1930s. The older part contains still about 1300 tombstones, the newer part (on ...
Founded: 1058 | Location: Worms, Germany

St. Martin's Church

Accordin the legend St. Martin was once imprisoned in a dungeon underneath this church in Worms, which was built in the 12th century. It was the chapter church of the Martinsstift, which no longer survives. Until the 15th century, the Martinskirche was a burial place for the Kämmerer family, named von Dahlberg, whose courts lay nearby in the Kämmererstrasse. The church is a Romanesque church, with red sandstone walls w ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Worms, Germany

St. Paul's Church

St. Paul"s Chapter Church was built by Bishop Burchard (who also built the first Worms Cathedral) in 1002. It was originally a three-naved buttress basilica. A Dominican monastery was added in 1226. Also in the 13th century, the stone dome-shaped tower roofs were added in the Byzantine style of Jerusalem"s churches. These make the church a visible monument to the Crusades. The Pauluskirche was desconsecrated a ...
Founded: 1002 | Location: Worms, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.