St. Martin's Church

Worms, Germany

Accordin the legend St. Martin was once imprisoned in a dungeon underneath this church in Worms, which was built in the 12th century. It was the chapter church of the Martinsstift, which no longer survives. Until the 15th century, the Martinskirche was a burial place for the Kämmerer family, named von Dahlberg, whose courts lay nearby in the Kämmererstrasse.

The church is a Romanesque church, with red sandstone walls whose whitewash was recently stripped away. It is a buttress basilica with three naves and a straight chancel. Architectural forms from the 12th century.

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Address

Ludwigsplatz 7-8, Worms, Germany
See all sites in Worms

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.sacred-destinations.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva-Maria Hausberg (7 months ago)
Ein Wohlfühlort.
Thomas Sondermann (10 months ago)
Schöne Kirche.
Reinhard Kissel (12 months ago)
Der mediterrane Innenhof ist sehr schön!
Micha Weiss (12 months ago)
Diese Kirche lohnt sich sehr. St Martin hat sich hier aufgehalten, das Bauwerk hat Einflüsse aus vielen Epochen und nachdem man den auch sehr schönen Garten drum herum begutachtet hat, bietet sich innen eine sehr eindrucksvolle Stimmung. Absolut lohnenswert!
Rüdiger Glaser (19 months ago)
Eine der schönsten Kirchen in Worms
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