St. Paul's Church

Worms, Germany

St. Paul's Chapter Church was built by Bishop Burchard (who also built the first Worms Cathedral) in 1002. It was originally a three-naved buttress basilica.

A Dominican monastery was added in 1226. Also in the 13th century, the stone dome-shaped tower roofs were added in the Byzantine style of Jerusalem's churches. These make the church a visible monument to the Crusades.

The Pauluskirche was desconsecrated and the monastery destroyed in 1797 in the interests of secularization. In the decades that followed, the church was used as a warehouse, a barn and finally as a municipal museum (1880).

In 1929, Dominican religious life began again here and is still an active community. The resident monks conduct services, prayers and confession, and some also work as hospital or prison chaplains. The Pauluskirche was badly damaged by bombing on February 21, 1945, but through the support of local citizens it was rebuilt and back in service in 1947.

The present nave of the Pauluskirche was rebuilt in the Baroque era, but the remainder of the building is 11th-century Romanesque.

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Address

Paulusplatz 5, Worms, Germany
See all sites in Worms

Details

Founded: 1002
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.sacred-destinations.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Burkhard Kremer (5 months ago)
Historisch und kunsthistorisch bedeutsamer Ort
Raimund Werz (9 months ago)
GLEICH GEGENÜBER DER DER KAISERPASAGE KOMMT MANN ÜBER EINE KLEINE GASSE ZUM DOMINIKANER KLOSTER MIT KIRCHE DERZEIT WERDEN DIE KIRCHENTÜRME AUFWENDIG RESTAURIERT. DIE KIRCHE HAT EINE TOLLE AURA. HIER WERDEN NOVIZEN FÜR ZUKÜNFTIGE AUFGABEN VORBEREITET. ENTWEDER IN DER MISSION ODER VOR ORT. DER KLANG DER KLOCKEN IST WUNDERSCHÖN UND IST BALSAM FÜR DIE SEELE.
Hans-Jürgen Schmitz-Liedtke (10 months ago)
Gute Athmosphäre. Tolle Veranstaltungen. Kirche mit "Heidentürmen".
U.R. Fischer (12 months ago)
Ruhe und Erholung vom Alltag und einen Wechsel der Perspektive zu Problemen sollte jeder mal erleben
Markus Wittke (14 months ago)
Absoluter Geheimtipp: Das aktive Dominikanerkloster ist in wundervollen Gemäuern untergebracht. Der Garten im Kreuzgang ist eine kleine Oase mitten in der Stadt. Die Kirche St. Paulus ist eine der ganz wenigen in Deutschland die diese "Kuppeltürme" hat. Die Idee dazu wurde von den Kreuzfahrern damals mit nach Worms gebracht... Ein Ort also mit vielen interessanten Geheimnissen
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