Worms Jewish Cemetery

Worms, Germany

The Jewish Cemetery in Worms is usually called the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe. The Jewish community of Worms was established by the early eleventh century, and the oldest tombstone still legible dates from 1058/59. The cemetery was closed in 1911, when a new cemetery was inaugurated. Some family burials continued until the late 1930s. The older part contains still about 1300 tombstones, the newer part (on the wall of the former city fortifications, acquired after 1689, more than 1200.

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Details

Founded: 1058
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charly G. (21 months ago)
Spaziergang durch 1000 Jahren.
Rainer Harteneck (2 years ago)
Heiliger Sand The Rabbinental ("Vale of the Rabbis") in the cemetery View of Worms Cathedral from the cemetery, known as the Martin Buber view. Buber wrote of this view, reflecting on the ties between God and the Jews and between Jewry and Christendom.[1] The Jewish Cemetery in Worms or Heiliger Sand, in Worms, Germany, is usually called the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe,[2] although the Jewish burials in the Jewish sections of the Roman catacombs predate it by a millennium. The Jewish community of Worms was established by the early eleventh century, and the oldest tombstone still legible dates from 1058/59.[3] The cemetery was closed in 1911, when a new cemetery was inaugurated. Some family burials continued until the late 1930s. The older part still contains about 1,300 tombstones, the newer part (on the wall of the former city fortifications, acquired after 1689) more than 1,200. The cemetery is protected and cared for by the city of Worms, the Jewish community of Mainz-Worms, and the Landesdenkmalamt of Rhineland-Palatinate. The Salomon L. Steinheim-Institute for German-Jewish History at the University of Duisburg-Essen has been documenting and researching it since 2005.
Volker Braun (2 years ago)
Zu den Bildern gibt es noch folgendes zu sagen. Auf zwei Grabsteinen türmen sich die zusammengefalteten Zettel derart, dass sie regelmäßig abgeräumt werden – und begraben. Auf dass all die Wünsche und Bitten in Erfüllung gehen. Sie gelten dem Frankfurter Kaufmann Alexander ben Salomon Wimpfen. Vor allem aber dem Rabbi Meir von Rothenburg. Bei Gräbern berühmter Rabbiner ist es  Brauch, sogenannte "Quittlech“ (zusammengerollte Zettel) zu hinterlassen. Darauf werden geheime Wünsche und Bitten niedergeschrieben und man hofft, dass der Zaddik (der Gerechte) die Bitten vor dem Thron Gottes vorträgt.
Daniel Rodríguez (2 years ago)
Este lugar es el cementerio judío más antiguo de Europa. Un lugar totalmente impresionante y poco conocido.
ilan tal (4 years ago)
The Jewish Cemetery in Worms or Heiliger Sand, is usually called the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe
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