Top Historic Sights in Haninge, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Haninge

Dalarö Church

The wooden church of Dalarö was built in 1651, couple of decades after Dalarö was established as a toll station of Stockholm city. The church got its present appearance in 1787. It has survived completely from the large fires in Dalarö. There is a pulpit from 1630s, originally created for Tyresö church but donated to Dalarö in 1639 (because it was not considered good enough for the new church i ...
Founded: 1651 | Location: Haninge, Sweden

Österhaninge Church

The medieval Österhaninge church date from the 13th century. The sacristy and porch were added in 1400s and the tower in 1587. The chapel of Bielkenstierna family was designed by Nicodemus Tessin the Older in 1663. The marble epitaph was made by Nicolas Millich in 1680. Also the pulpit date from the 17th century.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Haninge, Sweden

Årsta Castle

The history of Årsta manor date to the 14th century, when it was a residence of Teutonic Order of Livonia. In 1467 it was acquired by Erik Axelsson Tott. The present main building was built by the Claes Hansson Bielkenstierna around the year 1650. After him Årsta has been owned by Kurck, Soop and Fleming families. Today it is owned by Cedergren family and hosts a restaurant.
Founded: ca. 1650 | Location: Haninge, Sweden

Sandemar Castle

At the beginning of the Kalmar Union age Sandemar was owned by the Teutonic Order of Livonia. Erik Axelsson Tott bought all the Order's property in Sweden in 1467. During the 1500s the ownership was unknown. In the 1600s the Sandemar belonged to families Oxenstierna, Bonde and Falkenberg. The Royal Council and president Gabriel Falkenberg completed the present main building around the year 1693. Sandemar is today privatel ...
Founded: 1693 | Location: Haninge, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kerameikos

Kerameikos was the potters" quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site"s small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.