Österhaninge Church

Haninge, Sweden

The medieval Österhaninge church date from the 13th century. The sacristy and porch were added in 1400s and the tower in 1587. The chapel of Bielkenstierna family was designed by Nicodemus Tessin the Older in 1663. The marble epitaph was made by Nicolas Millich in 1680. Also the pulpit date from the 17th century.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dennis Askling (5 years ago)
Otroligt vacker kyrka med riktigt bra gudstjänster. Begravningsplatsen är också mycket fin där den kända Fredrika Bremer med familj vilar. Kan varmt rekommendera att besöka kyrkan och dess omgivning när det väl är öppet hus. Då kyrkan ligger en bit från vägen och nära intill skogen så blir omgivningen stillsam och tilltalande.
Rita Rabenius (6 years ago)
Underbar kyrka
Marianne Karlsson (6 years ago)
Underbar kyrka med FANTASTISK musik och sång i en Minnesstund omkring nära och kära genom Halldoffs Begravningsbyrå
Tim Boende (9 years ago)
A beautiful church in a very scenic location. It's tilted tower is famous and, of course, has a charming story. But this is a perfect little church and worth anyone's time to stop and visit!
Nicko Rcs (10 years ago)
It's a nice church
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