The history of Årsta manor date to the 14th century, when it was a residence of Teutonic Order of Livonia. In 1467 it was acquired by Erik Axelsson Tott. The present main building was built by the Claes Hansson Bielkenstierna around the year 1650. After him Årsta has been owned by Kurck, Soop and Fleming families. Today it is owned by Cedergren family and hosts a restaurant.

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Address

Södra allén, Haninge, Sweden
See all sites in Haninge

Details

Founded: ca. 1650
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans Gustafsson (7 months ago)
Jäyteschyst. Nu ser msn och känner man atmodfären på en golfklubb. Restustanten har väldigt välsmakande mat och en lagom matsedel
Peter Löfgren (7 months ago)
Jättegod lunch!
Ronnie Norén (2 years ago)
God mat i en helt underbar slottsmiljö och med en helt förträfflig personal. Full pott ifrån mig.
Daniel Öderyd (2 years ago)
Very impressive! We had the reception for our daughter’s baptism in Årsta Castle in July 2017 and could not be more impressed! The Castle itself is absolutely stunning and the dining room with the big chandelier was perfect for our 60 guests. Equally impressive was the service, the food and the price for the most accommodating staff I’ve encountered in a long time. We held the baptism in Österhaninge Church just a few minutes away from the Castle and realized just a week before that our guest count far exceeded the allowed number in the church reception house. So with just one week’s notice they put a beautiful lunch together for our 60 guests that went off without a hitch. Despite our last minute request and our obvious desperation, they didn’t charge a premium and we actually ended up spending less than we had planned for catering. I cannot praise them enough for the experience they provided for our family and guests.
David Svens (3 years ago)
Good service
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