Dalarö Church

Haninge, Sweden

The wooden church of Dalarö was built in 1651, couple of decades after Dalarö was established as a toll station of Stockholm city. The church got its present appearance in 1787. It has survived completely from the large fires in Dalarö.

There is a pulpit from 1630s, originally created for Tyresö church but donated to Dalarö in 1639 (because it was not considered good enough for the new church in Tyresö). Around the church is a small cemetery that has not been used since the 1880s. A freestanding bell tower from 1745 is located on a hill near the church.

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Details

Founded: 1651
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

www.guyplatt.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karin Pettersson (2 years ago)
Beautiful and peaceful church on Dalarö. Here there are many feelings and memories that took place. Marriage for mom and dad. Baptism for me and my older brother. Also some funerals that you had to go through. The church is very nice and suitable. Right by the blue sea. Absolutely wonderful. In the middle of the archipelago.
Annika Molin (2 years ago)
Delightful and located in the middle of idyllic Dalarö.
Lars Stegemann (2 years ago)
Beautiful old church. Very welcoming.
Bert Sundin (3 years ago)
Incredibly beautiful church in a nice environment.
Deluxee (4 years ago)
Small church for a small community!
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