Dalarö Church

Haninge, Sweden

The wooden church of Dalarö was built in 1651, couple of decades after Dalarö was established as a toll station of Stockholm city. The church got its present appearance in 1787. It has survived completely from the large fires in Dalarö.

There is a pulpit from 1630s, originally created for Tyresö church but donated to Dalarö in 1639 (because it was not considered good enough for the new church in Tyresö). Around the church is a small cemetery that has not been used since the 1880s. A freestanding bell tower from 1745 is located on a hill near the church.

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Details

Founded: 1651
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

www.guyplatt.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Deluxee (2 years ago)
Small church for a small community!
Joacim Olofson (2 years ago)
Cozy archipelago church!
Karin Eriksson-Gutö (3 years ago)
Nice atmosphere. Devotion with peace of mind
TEAMSAFETY (3 years ago)
Nice church unbeatable beautiful location
Tobbe Eek (3 years ago)
Nice little church that fits well for smaller events. Large and beautiful windows that give good light insights to the ceremony. The priest gave a "modern" impression and had a relaxed style that I liked.
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