Sandemar Castle

Haninge, Sweden

At the beginning of the Kalmar Union age Sandemar was owned by the Teutonic Order of Livonia. Erik Axelsson Tott bought all the Order's property in Sweden in 1467. During the 1500s the ownership was unknown. In the 1600s the Sandemar belonged to families Oxenstierna, Bonde and Falkenberg. The Royal Council and president Gabriel Falkenberg completed the present main building around the year 1693. Sandemar is today privately owned by Karin Mattson Nordin, daughter of the real estate developer John Mattson.

The main building of Sandemar is made of wood, covered with tiles and the water side plates to protect against sea winds. The farm escaped the Russian ravages in 1719, probably through the deterrent effect of the nearby Dalarö Fortress had, and have therefore preserved the Carolinian period decorations. The English garden is added later with greenhouse, vegetable and fruit tree plantations.

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Address

Sandemar 2, Haninge, Sweden
See all sites in Haninge

Details

Founded: 1693
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Birgitta Marklund (2 years ago)
Fint för fågelskådning och vårblommor
Helene Nilsson (2 years ago)
En jättebra plats om man vill se mkt fåglar och nu är det många flyttade som har kommit. Fågeltorn finns
Eric Hellne (3 years ago)
Vill man uppleva naturen utan att bli störd så ska man åka hit.
Peter Gustafsson (3 years ago)
Väldigt vackert område
Melker Larsson (4 years ago)
En mycket bra plats för fågelskådning, fågeltorn finns nere vid sjöängen, där kan man se många olika vadare i maj och i juli-augusti.
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