Sandemar Castle

Haninge, Sweden

At the beginning of the Kalmar Union age Sandemar was owned by the Teutonic Order of Livonia. Erik Axelsson Tott bought all the Order's property in Sweden in 1467. During the 1500s the ownership was unknown. In the 1600s the Sandemar belonged to families Oxenstierna, Bonde and Falkenberg. The Royal Council and president Gabriel Falkenberg completed the present main building around the year 1693. Sandemar is today privately owned by Karin Mattson Nordin, daughter of the real estate developer John Mattson.

The main building of Sandemar is made of wood, covered with tiles and the water side plates to protect against sea winds. The farm escaped the Russian ravages in 1719, probably through the deterrent effect of the nearby Dalarö Fortress had, and have therefore preserved the Carolinian period decorations. The English garden is added later with greenhouse, vegetable and fruit tree plantations.

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Address

Sandemar 2, Haninge, Sweden
See all sites in Haninge

Details

Founded: 1693
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sofia Lindström (4 months ago)
Fantastiskt vackert med möjlighet att njuta av utsikten från fågeltornet. Reklmmenderas starpt. Dock minus en stjärna baserat på alla bromsar och insekter. Då en går igenom en kohage så får en räkna med en hel del koskit. Pga kor inget som rekommenderas till hundägare.
Inge-Marie Bodin (4 months ago)
Many beautiful flowers. This year we also saw Maj viva. Many nice places to eat brought a packed lunch. We also got to see how they took care of a cow calving that morning. She would be moved to a smaller pasture so that the calf would be able to keep up with the mother cow. She had calves in the big one and there it is difficult for the calf to keep up with the mother.
Rostam Zandi (8 months ago)
Hard to fail with this nature reserve!
Anders Joachimsson (9 months ago)
One of my favorite areas in the Stockholm area
Mikhail Itiviti (9 months ago)
Nothing to do in winter. No circle paths. Just be aware. Dirty routes. Need good boots. From one side is private omrade
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