Top Historic Sights in Norrtälje, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Norrtälje

Norrtälje Church

In 1719, during the Great Northern War, large parts of the central town were burnt down by a Russian army. The new stone church wasn"t finished until 1726. The tower was erected in 1752.
Founded: 1726 | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Singö Church

The wooden church of Singö was built in 1753, but fitments date mainly from Middle Ages. The altar was made around 1490, the pulpit in the 16th century and the votive ship in 1752.
Founded: 1753 | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Penningby Castle

Penningby Castle is one of the most well-preserved castles from the early Vasa era. Penningby Manor is first mentioned in the 1330s. To the northeast is an overgrown ruin castle with a moat, which may be the remains of a predecessor to the castle. Its earliest owners included Lord Tord Bonde, burgrave of Raasepori and margrave of Viipuri castles. In late 15th century, a fortress was built by its owners, initiated by Lady ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Häverö Church

Häverö Church was built around the year 1300. The mural paintings in vaults date from 1470. The belfry, built in the style of Norwegian Stave churches, date from the 16th century and is one the oldest in Sweden. The magnificent altar was made in Antwerpen in the early 16th century.
Founded: ca. 1300 | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Roslags-Bro Church

Roslags-Bro church was built of granite in the 13th century. The tower was added in the 1400s and restored in 1700s. The church is famous due its fine sculptures. The wooden sculpture of Eric IX of Sweden, made in France in 1200s, has been model to Stockholm city coat of arms. The crucifix made in Gotland and font date also from the 13th century. The altar and other saint sculptures date from the 15th century.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Edebo Church

The present stone church was built during the second half of 1400s, but the vestry may date from the 1200s. The church is decorated with well-preserved frescoes made by so-called "Edebo master". Paintings depict events from the Old and New Testament. The porch was built in 1514. A bell tower stands on the other side of the highway northwest of the church. The large bell was cast in 1625.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Väddö Church

Väddö Church was built in 1870 to replace the previous medieval church. It is one of the largest in the area. The interior date mainly from the earlier churches. The font was made of Gotland’s limestone in the around 1300. Two cruficixes date also from the Middle Ages and there are some medieval carvings in walls.
Founded: 1870 | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Frötuna Church

Frötuna Church was built of grey stone in the 12th century. It was extended to east between 1250–1275. The tomb dates from the mid-1600s. There are several medieval aftefacts in Frötuna church, including a triump crucifix (1275), font (1200s) and sculpture of St. Olaf (early 1300s). The pulpit was made in 1640s and the altar dates from 1773.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Söderby-Karl Church

Söderby-Karl Church was built around 1300 or soon later. The porch was added later in the 1300s and brick arches in the mid-1400s. The external bell tower was erected probably in 1664. The main restoration was done in 1790. The interior is decorated with beautiful murals from the late Middle Ages which have never been overpainted. The sandstone font dates from 1200s.
Founded: c. 1300 | Location: Norrtälje, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Cesis Castle

German crusaders known as the Livonian Brothers of the Sword began construction of the Cēsis castle (Wenden) near the hill fort in 1209. When the castle was enlarged and fortified, it served as the residence for the Order's Master from 1237 till 1561, with periodic interruptions. Its ruins are some of the most majestic castle ruins in the Baltic states. Once the most important castle of the Livonian Order, it was the official residence for the masters of the order.

In 1577, during the Livonian War, the garrison destroyed the castle to prevent it from falling into the control of Ivan the Terrible, who was decisively defeated in the Battle of Wenden (1578).

In 1598 it was incorporated into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Wenden Voivodship was created here. In 1620 Wenden was conquered by Sweden. It was rebuilt afterwards, but was destroyed again in 1703 during the Great Northern War by the Russian army and left in a ruined state. Already from the end of the 16th century, the premises of the Order's castle were adjusted to the requirements of the Cēsis Castle estate. When in 1777 the Cēsis Castle estate was obtained by Count Carl Sievers, he had his new residence house built on the site of the eastern block of the castle, joining its end wall with the fortification tower.

Since 1949, the Cēsis History Museum has been located in this New Castle of the Cēsis Castle estate. The front yard of the New Castle is enclosed by a granary and a stable-coach house, which now houses the Exhibition Hall of the Museum. Beside the granary there is the oldest brewery in Latvia, Cēsu alus darītava, which was built in 1878 during the later Count Sievers' time, but its origins date back to the period of the Livonian Order. Further on, the Cēsis Castle park is situated, which was laid out in 1812. The park has the romantic characteristic of that time, with its winding footpaths, exotic plants, and the waters of the pond reflecting the castle's ruins. Nowadays also one of the towers is open for tourists.