Top Historic Sights in Växjö, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Växjö

Old Gymnasium

The Gymnasium (Karolinska gymnasiet) was built between 1696-1715 using stones of Kronoberg Castle ruins. It was a grammar school at which Linnaeus, Per Henrik Ling and Peter Wieselgren were pupils.
Founded: 1696-1715 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Växjö Cathedral

Växjö Cathedral was built as a single-nave stone church around 1120. According the legend the Cathedral was built on the spot where St. Sigfrid founded a wooden church. His relics were kept here until the Reformation, when they were destroyed. The cathedral burnt down the first time in 1276 and has since been renovated numerous times. The lofty copper clad twin spires of the cathedral give Växjö a ver ...
Founded: ca. 1120 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Teleborg Castle

Despite its middle-age style, the The Castle of Teleborg was built in 1900 by architect firm Lindvall & Boklund. The castle was built as a wedding present from count Fredrik Bonde af Björnö to his wife Anna Koskull. 17 years later the couple had died, and the castle was used as a hotel for young girls and for accommodation in general. In 1964 the city of Växjö bought it and the surrounding park from the Bonde fami ...
Founded: 1900 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Småland Museum

Småland Museum is the oldest county museum in Sweden. It opened in the present building in 1885. Permanent exhibitions display the history of Småland from the Stone Ages through the silver treasure of Vikings to 19th and 20th century living style. There is also a glass museum.
Founded: 1885 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Kronoberg Castle Ruins

Kronoberg Castle is a medieval ruin located on an island in lake Helgasjön. In 1444 Lars Mikaelson, the bishop of Växjö, built a stone building on the lakeshore. During the Dano-Swedish War of 1470-1471, Danish forces destroyed the house. It was reconstructed and fortified after peace was restored in 1472. During the Swedish Reformation the castle and its estate were confiscated by Gustav Vasa. In 1542, during the Dac ...
Founded: 1472 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Jät Old Church

The Old Church of Jät dates from the year 1226. The wooden sacristy was made in 1733. The external belfry was built probably in the 17th century. It was damaged by fire in 1924 and restored in 1929. The interior is richly decorated by local artist Johan Christian Zschotzscher in 1749. The crucifix dates from the late Middle Ages. There is a legend about Miss Eketrä, who was buried in the crypt. When they opened ...
Founded: 1226 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Bergkvara Castle Ruins

Bergkvara Castle had originally five floors and four corner towers. It was probably built by Arvid Trolle around 1470-1480. It was owned by his family 150 years and played an important part as a political and economical power centre. Nils Dacke, the leader of the famous peasant revolt, besieged the castle in 1542 and then attacked and burned it to the ground. The castle was left to decay until in 1794 count Arvid Eric Pos ...
Founded: 1470-1480 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Östrabo Bishop’s House

Östrabo biskopsgård (Bishop’s House) consists of main building (built 1792-1796) and four annexes. It was built by bishop Olof Wallquist.
Founded: 1792-1796 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Jelling Runestones

The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.

The Jelling stones stand in the churchyard of Jelling church between two large mounds. The stones represent the transitional period between the indigenous Norse paganism and the process of Christianization in Denmark; the larger stone is often cited as Denmark's baptismal certificate (dåbsattest), containing a depiction of Christ. They are strongly identified with the creation of Denmark as a nation state and both stones feature one of the earliest records of the name 'Danmark'.

After having been exposed to all kinds of weather for a thousand years cracks are beginning to show. On the 15th of November 2008 experts from UNESCO examined the stones to determine their condition. Experts requested that the stones be moved to an indoor exhibition hall, or in some other way protected in situ, to prevent further damage from the weather.

Heritage Agency of Denmark decided to keep the stones in their current location and selected a protective casing design from 157 projects submitted through a competition. The winner of the competition was Nobel Architects. The glass casing creates a climate system that keeps the stones at a fixed temperature and humidity and protects them from weathering. The design features rectangular glass casings strengthened by two solid bronze sides mounted on a supporting steel skeleton. The glass is coated with an anti-reflective material that gives the exhibit a greenish hue. Additionally, the bronze patina gives off a rusty, greenish colour, highlighting the runestones' gray and reddish tones and emphasising their monumental character and significance.