Kronoberg Castle Ruins

Växjö, Sweden

Kronoberg Castle is a medieval ruin located on an island in lake Helgasjön. In 1444 Lars Mikaelson, the bishop of Växjö, built a stone building on the lakeshore. During the Dano-Swedish War of 1470-1471, Danish forces destroyed the house. It was reconstructed and fortified after peace was restored in 1472. During the Swedish Reformation the castle and its estate were confiscated by Gustav Vasa.

In 1542, during the Dacke War, Kronoberg was taken over by rebels led by Nils Dacke. The revolt was suppressed in 1543, and control reverted to the crown. Due to its strategic location near the border between Sweden and Denmark at the time, the castle was further fortified, and became a stronghold in this part of Småland. The king's son John III ordered additional improvements that never were carried out. The castle had great military significance during the Northern Seven Years War (1564-1570). In the winter of 1568, Eric XIV used Kronoborg as a support point while beating back a Danish attack from Skåne. In 1570 the castle was successfully besieged and burned by the Danes. Between 1576 and 1580 construction continued, after which the castle had at least 50 cannon. Duke Charles continued work on the fortifications, but in the end of January 1612 the castle was again taken and burned by Danish troops under Breide Rantzau. Reconstruction was not started until 1616.

As late as the reign of Charles XI Kronoberg castle was in good condition. However, after the Treaty of Roskilde was signed in 1658, the Swedish-Danish border was moved to Øresund, and Kronoberg castle lost its military significance. Neglected, the building began to decay and became a ruin.

The castle ruin is open to tourists in the summer months. It is located just short drive from Växjö, Sweden.

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Details

Founded: 1472
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jim Reynders (10 months ago)
The ruins are closed permanently. The surroundings are great and there's a cafe nearby.
July Sky (2 years ago)
We took a return trip from Nybro and stopped by this old castle ruin. We were a bit disappointed, because the courtyard was not worth seeing. All the other rooms were not accessible due to risk of falling rocks. There is no entrance fee at the moment. The castle is more beautiful from the outside currently. Explanations were in English and Swedish. A toilet is not far away.
Stefan Martensson (2 years ago)
A ruin under rehab... Large sections closed off as they are not safe. Great experience and it's free!
Javier Esteban (3 years ago)
Nice place for a day out. I would suggest to arrive by boat to make the experience even better. The castle is small but you can kind of feel what was to be there when Denmark was at the other side of the lake. Bonus point because the cafe serves a pretty good Skagen!
Neil Vincent Misa Garciano (3 years ago)
The castle ruin is great. Place is excellent. For the people who have stomach or IBS problems, there are toilets public and inside the store.
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