Kronoberg Castle Ruins

Växjö, Sweden

Kronoberg Castle is a medieval ruin located on an island in lake Helgasjön. In 1444 Lars Mikaelson, the bishop of Växjö, built a stone building on the lakeshore. During the Dano-Swedish War of 1470-1471, Danish forces destroyed the house. It was reconstructed and fortified after peace was restored in 1472. During the Swedish Reformation the castle and its estate were confiscated by Gustav Vasa.

In 1542, during the Dacke War, Kronoberg was taken over by rebels led by Nils Dacke. The revolt was suppressed in 1543, and control reverted to the crown. Due to its strategic location near the border between Sweden and Denmark at the time, the castle was further fortified, and became a stronghold in this part of Småland. The king's son John III ordered additional improvements that never were carried out. The castle had great military significance during the Northern Seven Years War (1564-1570). In the winter of 1568, Eric XIV used Kronoborg as a support point while beating back a Danish attack from Skåne. In 1570 the castle was successfully besieged and burned by the Danes. Between 1576 and 1580 construction continued, after which the castle had at least 50 cannon. Duke Charles continued work on the fortifications, but in the end of January 1612 the castle was again taken and burned by Danish troops under Breide Rantzau. Reconstruction was not started until 1616.

As late as the reign of Charles XI Kronoberg castle was in good condition. However, after the Treaty of Roskilde was signed in 1658, the Swedish-Danish border was moved to Øresund, and Kronoberg castle lost its military significance. Neglected, the building began to decay and became a ruin.

The castle ruin is open to tourists in the summer months. It is located just short drive from Växjö, Sweden.

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Details

Founded: 1472
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dominik Bertsch (20 months ago)
Beautiful landscape. The castle ruin is located on a small island at lake Helgasjön. Open daily from June to August.
Rohit Jayaram (2 years ago)
There was a private function (wedding) at the castle which prevented us from going in ... Would have been nice to know this was the case, before parking and walking up to the castle ruins.
biscaya08 (2 years ago)
Visited this place outside opening hours so couldn't go into the castle but it was well worth it anyway. The castle is beautiful and so are the surroundings. A nice place to just sit and relax since it's quite and peaceful. I was there in the evening so it's probably busier during opening hours. It's easy to park close by.
Bajias Liljeding (2 years ago)
Not the biggest castle but an interesting part of swedish history. It's a short visit but great for a picnic or a snack at the local cafe.
Melli Wika (2 years ago)
Its an interesting place for history lovers. There are a couple of stands with pictures and information about the life in the castle etc. If you're thinking about visiting, do it in summer time because otherwise it will be closed and you wont get in. In winter time you'll be go around and explore it but wont be able to get it if you are scared of ruin your clothes.
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