Växjö Cathedral

Växjö, Sweden

Växjö Cathedral was built as a single-nave stone church around 1120. According the legend the Cathedral was built on the spot where St. Sigfrid founded a wooden church. His relics were kept here until the Reformation, when they were destroyed.

The cathedral burnt down the first time in 1276 and has since been renovated numerous times. The lofty copper clad twin spires of the cathedral give Växjö a very special profile. The interior is quite modern, the oldest item is an altar screen dating from 1779. A Viking rune stone from the 12th century can also be seen adjacent to the cathedral´s eastern wall.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.
  • vaxjotourist.com

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Details

Founded: ca. 1120
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Southern Gothic (3 years ago)
A beautiful protestant church in the center of Vaxjo.
RebekkaIvacson (3 years ago)
Quiet church, very beautiful, very simple. I definitely recommend to visit this amazing monumental church.
Nikolaj Antonov (4 years ago)
Has roots in the early Middle Ages and the legend of St. Sigfrid is linked to the oldest cathedral of Växjö, who was bishop church already in the 1100s
K ai (4 years ago)
Didn't go in but I wouldn't recommend it from the outside. 10/10 would avoid at all costs.
gija Kim (9 years ago)
When I visited Växjö, I went to the mass in Växjö Cathedral at 11:00 am on 5th Aug. I met a Swedish man who went to Växjö university. He was very kind to me and asked to shake hands twice. It weighted on my mind that I left there and him in a hurry because I had to visit important place there. I want to arrive my apology to him someday. From a Korean girl
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