Bergkvara Castle Ruins

Växjö, Sweden

Bergkvara Castle had originally five floors and four corner towers. It was probably built by Arvid Trolle around 1470-1480. It was owned by his family 150 years and played an important part as a political and economical power centre. Nils Dacke, the leader of the famous peasant revolt, besieged the castle in 1542 and then attacked and burned it to the ground. The castle was left to decay until in 1794 count Arvid Eric Posse build a new main building next to the old ruins.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.
  • Enjoy Sweden

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Details

Founded: 1470-1480
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rikard Svensson (16 months ago)
Nice surroundings but the ruin is maybe not the most impressive.
Nataly Sazhyna (20 months ago)
Nice place but complicated to find right entrance ( its located on private land). Hope my pics will help to next visitors;)
Stephen Morris (2 years ago)
A Castle Ruin from medieval times, not much left of the ruin however the setting and scenery around the castle ruin is beauiful, pick your day, You wont be disappointed
Stephen Morris (2 years ago)
A Castle Ruin from medieval times, not much left of the ruin however the setting and scenery around the castle ruin is beauiful, pick your day, You wont be disappointed
Hilde Wilde (3 years ago)
Nice to look at after a long carride. We took alittle walk. Checked out the ruins and afterwards we walked to the lovely Cafè close by. Perfect break.
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