Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Croatia

Mirogoj Cemetery

The Mirogoj Cemetery is considered to be among the more noteworthy landmarks in Zagreb. The cemetery inters members of all religious groups: Catholic, Orthodox, Muslim, Jewish, Protestant, Latter Day Saints; irreligious graves can all be found. In the arcades are the last resting places of many famous Croatians. The Mirogoj Cemetery was built on a plot of land owned by the linguist Ljudevit Gaj, purchased by the city in ...
Founded: 1876 | Location: Zagreb, Croatia

Racic Family Mausoleum

The Mausoleum of the Račić family (Our Lady of Angels) is the work of the Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović, built in 1922. It is located in the Saint Rocco Cemetery, on the highest point of the Rat Peninsula, above the urban centre of Cavtat. It can be approached from the southern side following the street near the Our Lady of Snow Franciscan Monastery, or continuing along Prijeko Street from the east. In the place o ...
Founded: 1922 | Location: Cavtat, Croatia

Dudik Memorial Park

Dudik Memorial Park site is dedicated to 455 individuals who were executed by the authorities of the Independent State of Croatia during the World War II in Yugoslavia. In 1945 mortal remains of 384 victims were exhumed and placed in the common ossuary dedicated to the victims of Dudik, fallen soldiers of the 5th Vojvodina Brigade of the 36th Vojvodina Division and the Red Army soldiers who fought within the Vukovar area ...
Founded: 1945 | Location: Vukovar, Croatia

Mestrovic Mausoleum

Meštrović family mausoleum is located on a hill in Otavice, built by the famous Croatian sculptor Ivan Meštrović (1883-1962). He was a Croatian sculptor, architect and writer.
Founded: 1962 | Location: Otavice, Croatia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.