Mirogoj Cemetery

Zagreb, Croatia

The Mirogoj Cemetery is considered to be among the more noteworthy landmarks in Zagreb. The cemetery inters members of all religious groups: Catholic, Orthodox, Muslim, Jewish, Protestant, Latter Day Saints; irreligious graves can all be found. In the arcades are the last resting places of many famous Croatians.

The Mirogoj Cemetery was built on a plot of land owned by the linguist Ljudevit Gaj, purchased by the city in 1872, after his death. Architect Hermann Bollé designed the main building. The new cemetery was inaugurated on 6 November 1876.

The construction of the arcades, the cupolas, and the church in the entryway was begun in 1879. Due to lack of funding, work was finished only in 1929.

Unlike the older cemeteries, which were church-owned, Mirogoj was owned by the city, and accepted burials from all religious backgrounds.

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Details

Founded: 1876
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Martina Topic (11 months ago)
Mirogoj is definitely one of must see places in Zagreb, whether you are a tourist or you live in Zagreb. Apart from being the eternal home of Croatian greats and citizens of Zagreb, it is not an average cemetery thanks to its architecture and wonderful arcades. Even thought arcades were damaged in 2020 earthquake, you can still see them from distance.
Carina Choulian (13 months ago)
Beautiful works of art. Quiet and inspiring.
Carina Choulian (13 months ago)
Beautiful works of art. Quiet and inspiring.
Christina Marie (14 months ago)
A graveyard is usually not on my to-do list when on vacation, but this is not your average cemetery. It's absolutely gorgeous and a must see when in Zagreb. It would be remiss of anyone visiting the city to skip. It's the kind of place to wander around and get lost. Also, this is not a quick stop...give yourself at least an hour or more when visiting.
Christina Marie (14 months ago)
A graveyard is usually not on my to-do list when on vacation, but this is not your average cemetery. It's absolutely gorgeous and a must see when in Zagreb. It would be remiss of anyone visiting the city to skip. It's the kind of place to wander around and get lost. Also, this is not a quick stop...give yourself at least an hour or more when visiting.
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