Medieval castles in Sweden

Lindholmen Castle Ruins

Lindholmen Castle is a former Danish fortified castle on the banks of lake Börringe. It became an important fortification in the defence of Scania during the Middle Ages because of its strong encircling defensive walls and double moats. At the time, a small river and treacherous marshes made the terrain surrounding the castle hard to navigate. Originally a private castle, it was in 1339 turned over to Magnus Eriksson ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Svedala, Sweden

Göksholm Castle

Göksholm is the oldest privately-owned building in Sweden that has been continuously inhabited.In the middle ages Göksholm was just a fortified castle with a large tower. Its oldest existent parts have been dated to the 13th century. It was built (rebuilt and enlarged) during the Middle Ages through six different stages.After a fire at the end of the 16th century, the building was modernized according to that pe ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Stora Mellösa, Sweden

Mörby Castle Ruins

Mörby was first mentioned 1387 as built by the knight Henrik Damerow. Since 1452 it was owned by Oxenstierna family over 250 years. 1550 the castle was rebuilt after a fire. In 1733 it was left as a decay and the roof was ripped off and moved to Ekeby Castle. Finally Mörby was destroyed by fire in 1740. Today still impressive ruins remain including a tower body.
Founded: 1387 | Location: Rånäs, Sweden

Aose Castle Ruins

Ruins of Aose Castle are located close to the port of Åhus. This fortress, probably built in the 12th century and again in 1286, was protected by a high wall and a moat spanned by a drawbridge. It was destroyed in 1569 by Duke Karl, later to become King Karl IX of Sweden, and the ruins were gradually covered by drifting sand before being excavated in the late 1800s. It has always been widely assumed that the castle ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Åhus, Sweden

Hammersta Castle Ruins

Hammersta castle was a 13x18m wide two-storey stone building built around the year 1300 by Eringilse Nilsson, who"s father was married to a sister of Bridget of Sweden. Eringilse"s son (with the same name), was married to a Danish woman, Brita Olofsdotter Tott, and when the situation between Sweden and Denmark became tense around 1450, Tott was sentenced to death for spying for the Danes. Luckily for Brita she w ...
Founded: c. 1300 | Location: Nynäshamn, Sweden

Rumlaborg Castle Ruins

Rumlaborg castle was built around 1360 - the first written record dates from 1366. In 1434 it was burned down during the so-called Engelbrekt rebellion and rebuilt again in 1448 by Karl Knutsson Bonde. In the 17th century the castle lost its defensive purpose and in 1850s the site was moved as a park with pavillion.
Founded: c. 1360 | Location: Huskvarna, Sweden

Olsborg Castle Ruins

Olsborg Castle, also Olofsborg, was as a fortified castle located on a steep cliff, and might previous to later use been an early hill fort. It was constructed in 1503 or 1504 by the squire Nils Ragvaldsson from Åby, after a recent Swedish attack on Viken. Most of it was destroyed shortly after, when the commander of Bohus Fortress Otto Rud attacked on Christmas night 1504. After the turmoil created by the dethrone ...
Founded: 1503-1504 | Location: Sotenäs, Sweden

Almarestäkets Castle Ruins

Almarestäkets castle was built in the 1100s to protect the Sigtuna and Uppsala cities. It was also called as St. Erik"s castle after Eric IX. Throughout the Middle Ages there was a struggle between the Crown and Church who can control the castle. The castle was first mentioned in the late 1300s. In 1440 got Archbishop Nicolaus Ragvaldi permission to build a new castle, which was completed about ten years later. ...
Founded: 1440s | Location: Stäket, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château de Chaumont

The Château de Chaumont was founded in the 10th century by Odo I, Count of Blois. The purpose was to protect his lands from attacks from his feudal rivals, Fulk Nerra, Count of Anjou. On his behalf the Norman Gelduin received it, improved it and held it as his own. His great-niece Denise de Fougère, having married Sulpice d'Amboise, passed the château into the Amboise family for five centuries.

Pierre d'Amboise unsuccessfully rebelled against King Louis XI and his property was confiscated, and the castle was dismantled on royal order in 1465. It was later rebuilt by Charles I d'Amboise from 1465–1475 and then finished by his son, Charles II d'Amboise de Chaumont from 1498–1510, with help from his uncle, Cardinal Georges d'Amboise; some Renaissance features were to be seen in buildings that retained their overall medieval appearance. The château was acquired by Catherine de Medici in 1550. There she entertained numerous astrologers, among them Nostradamus. When her husband, Henry II, died in 1559 she forced his mistress, Diane de Poitiers, to exchange Château de Chaumont for Château de Chenonceau which Henry had given to de Poitiers. Diane de Poitiers only lived at Chaumont for a short while.

Later Chaumont has changed hands several times. Paul de Beauvilliers bought the château in 1699, modernized some of its interiors and decorated it with sufficient grandeur to house the duc d'Anjou on his way to become king of Spain in 1700. Monsieur Bertin demolished the north wing to open the house towards the river view in the modern fashion.

In 1750, Jacques-Donatien Le Ray purchased the castle as a country home where he established a glassmaking and pottery factory. He was considered the French "Father of the American Revolution" because he loved America. However, in 1789, the new French Revolutionary Government seized Le Ray's assets, including his beloved Château de Chaumont.

The castle has been classified as a Monument historique since 1840 by the French Ministry of Culture. The Château de Chaumont is currently a museum and every year hosts a Garden Festival from April to October where contemporary garden designers display their work in an English-style garden.