Medieval castles in Sweden

Lillö Castle Ruins

Lillö Castle was built in in the 14th century among the natural defences offered by the inaccessible marshlands and the River Helge å. The first known owner was Åke Axelsson (Tott) in 1343. The castle belonged to Tott, Trolle and Huitfeldt families until it was destroyed in 1658–59. Today, displays inside the castle based on the finds made during various archaeological digs reflect life here in days ...
Founded: c. 1343 | Location: Kristianstad, Sweden

Mörby Castle Ruins

Mörby was first mentioned 1387 as built by the knight Henrik Damerow. Since 1452 it was owned by Oxenstierna family over 250 years. 1550 the castle was rebuilt after a fire. In 1733 it was left as a decay and the roof was ripped off and moved to Ekeby Castle. Finally Mörby was destroyed by fire in 1740. Today still impressive ruins remain including a tower body.
Founded: 1387 | Location: Rånäs, Sweden

Telge Hus

Telge Hus, also known as Ragnhildsborg, was a medieval castle. The first castle, probably built in the early 1300s, was burnt down in 1445 and the new castle built in 1448.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Södertälje, Sweden

Örup Castle

Örup Castle was completed around the year 1500. Together with Glimmingehus, Bollerup and Tosterup, the castles were built as defenses in an uncertain and dangerous time, when the Swedes and Danes fought over power and lords believed they must protect their own soil against both external enemies. Örup was first mentioned in 1437 when it was owned by Danish family Qvitzow. Later it has been a residence of Flemmin ...
Founded: ca. 1500 | Location: Tomelilla, Sweden

Smedstorp Castle

Smedstorp Castle was owned by noble family Bing between 1313-1589. Later it has been a residence of families Quitzow, Bülow and Kruus. The present main building was originally the great hall of the castle built in the 16th century. Today there is no more remains of the original castle. Smedstorp is not open to the public.
Founded: 16th century | Location: Smedstorp, Sweden

Göksholm Castle

Göksholm is the oldest privately-owned building in Sweden that has been continuously inhabited.In the middle ages Göksholm was just a fortified castle with a large tower. Its oldest existent parts have been dated to the 13th century. It was built (rebuilt and enlarged) during the Middle Ages through six different stages.After a fire at the end of the 16th century, the building was modernized according to that pe ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Stora Mellösa, Sweden

Dynge Castle Ruins

Dynge Castle, also Dyngehus as it was once called, was a Norwegian fortified castle in use from approximately 1250 and onwards towards the beginning of the 16th century, when it burnt down. Located in central Bohuslän, since then passed into Swedish possession, the castle was mentioned several times in Norwegian records. The site was excavated 1912-1913 by Wilhelm Berg, who had also excavated the contemporary and lar ...
Founded: 1250 | Location: Uddevalla, Sweden

Vallen Castle Ruins

Vallen (or Isengrim) was one of the largest medieval castles in Scania. It was probably built in the 13th century, but its history is widely unknown. The castle hill is surrounded by moat the castle hill is over 40m wide and 12m high.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Tomelilla, Sweden

Thorberg Castle

Thorberg Castle is a former Carthusian monastery, or charterhouse, now a prison, located in Krauchthal. Of the castle of the von Thorberg family, first documented in 1175, there remain only fragments of the foundations of the tower. The family died out in 1397 with Peter von Thorberg, the last knight: he bequeathed his many estates to the Carthusians, who converted the castle into a Carthusian monastery (or charterhouse). ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Krauchthal, Switzerland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Palazzo Colonna

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.