Lillö Castle Ruins

Kristianstad, Sweden

Lillö Castle was built in in the 14th century among the natural defences offered by the inaccessible marshlands and the River Helge å. The first known owner was Åke Axelsson (Tott) in 1343. The castle belonged to Tott, Trolle and Huitfeldt families until it was destroyed in 1658–59. Today, displays inside the castle based on the finds made during various archaeological digs reflect life here in days gone by. Display panels in the courtyard provide information on the castle and its surroundings. A key is available from the Naturum Vattenriket visitor centre to gain admission to the castle.

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Details

Founded: c. 1343
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bo Hansson (3 years ago)
Nature and history meet between watercourses
Peter Anderson (3 years ago)
Always just as nice. A lot of flooding right now.
Sigrid Holmquist (4 years ago)
Sad, worn out military city. As recently as 2018, invested in a large shopping center outside the city center, which therefore died.
Thomas Karlsson (4 years ago)
An old castle ruin. Quite small so don't expect too much of it but it's historically important for the region. It's open for the public during the summer weekends but it's also possible to book and borrow the key at Naturum Vattenriket if you want to visit.
Lars Örtegren (4 years ago)
A ruin, but not possible to enter.
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