Göksholm is the oldest privately-owned building in Sweden that has been continuously inhabited.
In the middle ages Göksholm was just a fortified castle with a large tower. Its oldest existent parts have been dated to the 13th century. It was built (rebuilt and enlarged) during the Middle Ages through six different stages.

After a fire at the end of the 16th century, the building was modernized according to that period's style, getting a more regular plan, bigger windows and details in the Dutch renaissance style. Despite the thorough renovation, the medieval base structure remains. A painted inner ceiling from the time of this renaissance renovation exists with 121 cassettes which is remarkably well preserved today. 

Under the 17th century owners, Baron Knut Kurck and Baron Fleming, the castle was encrusted with portals, and circle-patterned outer buildings. Lars Gustaf Tersmeden had the ceiling renovated in 1801. This was the last big change in its structure. Some facade details were changed in the 1950s.

Historically Göksholm is famous for the popular uprising's leader Engelbrekt Engelbrektsson, the leader of the government, having been murdered on its lands in 1436 by Måns Bengtsson, the son and heir of the then owner of the castle.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna Andersson (13 months ago)
Nice park.
Mikael Stockhaus (14 months ago)
Nice castle but private land makes it only possible to see it from a distance, the surroundings after the road there are beautiful
Jimmy Alakangas (18 months ago)
Looks like a workplace! Really boring place
anders Nyström (2 years ago)
A time travel
Johan Linnér (2 years ago)
Not much to see ..
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