Nicodemus Tessins design

Mälsåker Castle

The history of Mälsåker palace stretches back to the Middle Ages when it probably was a simple stone house. During Sweden’s period as a great power in Europe in the 17th century the palace was owned by the Soop family. The famous architect Nikodemus Tessin was engaged to alter the building into one of the grandest baroque palaces in Sweden. The house was extended, wings and a terrace with stairs facing th ...
Founded: 1660s | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Vällinge Chapel

The Vällinge chapel, completed in 1679, was a former church of the local ironworks. The Baroque-style chapel was designed by Nicodemus Tessin the Younger.
Founded: 1679 | Location: Salem, Sweden

Steninge Palace

The Baroque-style Steninge Palace was built 1694-1698 to the design of architect Nicodemus Tessin the Younger, the palace is directly inspired by Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte in France, and has a reputation in Sweden as one of the most elegant examples of Baroque mansions. Steninge Palace was completed in 1705. The history of Steninge began in the end of 1200’s when the first known settlement was established. I ...
Founded: 1680-1705 | Location: Märsta, Sweden

Gripenberg Castle

Gripenberg Castle (Gripenbergs slott) is a wooden manor house. It is considered to be the biggest wooden castle in Sweden and one of the oldest that remain today as well. The castle was built in 1663 as a huntig seat for the field marshal Carl Gustaf Wrangel. Its architect is unknown, but there is some reason to believe, that it might have been Nicodemus Tessin the Elder. It is assumed that the castle"s name is deri ...
Founded: 1663 | Location: Tranås, Sweden

King Charles' Church

Karl (Charles) XI is perhaps the Swedish king that most enjoyed spending time in Kungsör and he had this church built for the Royal Manor. It took from 1690 to 1700 to build the church but unfortunately the king never saw it when it was finished. He died in 1697 when a lot of work remained to be done on the interior. To mark the bicentennial of his death, a large gilded copper crown was mounted on the church dome in ...
Founded: 1690-1700 | Location: Kungsör, Sweden

Kaggeholm Castle

The site where Kaggeholm Palace is located was first mentioned in a document in 1287. During the 1500s the farm was owned by members of the families Grip and Bååt. The farm was originally called Vettersjö, but was named by Swedish Count Lars Kagg (1595-1661) who bought the manor during 1647. Kagg was a political ally of King Gustavus Adolphus, a member of the Privy Council of Sweden and Field Marshal duri ...
Founded: 1725 | Location: Ekerö, Sweden

Clausholm Castle

Clausholm Castle is one of Denmark's finest Baroque buildings. The castle's origins appear to go back to the 12th century but it is first mentioned in the 14th century when its owner, Lage Ovesen, was one of the leaders of the Jute uprising against Valdemar Atterdag. At the time, Clausholm was a four-winged building surrounded by a moat. But when the first Danish primeminister, Grand Chancellor Conrad von Reventlow, acqui ...
Founded: 1690s | Location: Hadsten, Denmark

Kägleholm Castle Ruins

Kägleholm Castle was Built in the 1670s by chancellor Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie. It was designed by Nicodemus Tessin the Elder. History of the castle is short, since in 1712 it burned down and was never rebuilt. Today only cellar ruins remain of the castle.
Founded: 1670s | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen is located in the Isle of Man"s historic capital, Castletown. The castle is amongst the best examples of medieval castles in the British Isles, and is still in use as a court house, museum and educational centre.

The exact date of castle is unknown, although construction is thought to have taken place during the reigns of the late 12th century and early 13th century rulers of the Isle of Man – the Kings of Mann and the Isles. The original Castle Rushen consisted of a central square stone tower, or keep. The site was also fortified to guard the entrance to the Silver Burn. From its early beginnings, the castle was continually developed by successive rulers of Mann between the 13th and 16th century. The limestone walls dominated much of the surrounding landscape, serving as a point of dominance for the various rulers of the Isle of Man. By 1313, the original keep had been reinforced with towers to the west and south. In the 14th century, an east tower, gatehouses, and curtain wall were added.

After several more changes of hands the English and their supporters eventually prevailed. The English king Edward I Longshanks claimed that the island had belonged to the Kings of England for generations and he was merely reasserting their rightful claim to the Isle of Man.

The 18th century saw the castle in steady decay. By the end of the century it was converted into a prison. Even though the castle was in continuous use as a prison, the decline continued until the turn of the 20th century, when it was restored under the oversight of the Lieutenant Governor, George Somerset, 3rd Baron Raglan. Following the restoration work, and the completion of the purpose-built Victoria Road Prison in 1891, the castle was transferred from the British Crown to the Isle of Man Government in 1929.

Today it is run as a museum by Manx National Heritage, depicting the history of the Kings and Lords of Mann. Most rooms are open to the public during the opening season (March to October), and all open rooms have signs telling their stories. The exhibitions include a working medieval kitchen where authentic period food is prepared on special occasions and re-enactments of various aspects of medieval life are held on a regular basis, with particular emphasis on educating the local children about their history. Archaeological finds made during excavations in the 1980s are displayed and used as learning tools for visitors.