Gripenberg Castle

Tranås, Sweden

Gripenberg Castle (Gripenbergs slott) is a wooden manor house. It is considered to be the biggest wooden castle in Sweden and one of the oldest that remain today as well.

The castle was built in 1663 as a huntig seat for the field marshal Carl Gustaf Wrangel. Its architect is unknown, but there is some reason to believe, that it might have been Nicodemus Tessin the Elder. It is assumed that the castle's name is derived from the name of Wrangel's mother Margareta Grip and that Wrangel might have chosen it to commemorate her. By the end of the 17th century the castle was bought by Samuel von Söderling and remained in the possession of his family until today.

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Gripenbergs Gård 1, Tranås, Sweden
See all sites in Tranås

Details

Founded: 1663
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

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