Statues in Finland

Havis Amanda

Havis Amanda is a nude female statue sculpted by Ville Vallgren (1855-1940). He made it 1906 in Paris, but was not erected at its present location at the Market Square in Kaartinkaupunki until 1908. Havis Amanda is one of Vallgren's Parisian Art Nouveau works. She is a mermaid who stands on seaweed as she rises from the water, with four fish spouting water at her feet and surrounded by four sea lions. She is depicted ...
Founded: 1906 (erected 1908) | Location: Helsinki, Finland

Sibelius Monument

The Sibelius monument was designed by Eila Hiltunen and completed in 1967. It consists of series of more than 600 hollow steel pipes welded together in a wave-like pattern. The purpose of the artist was to capture the essence of the music of Sibelius. The monument weighs 24 tonnes. It’s probably the most well-known abstract sculpture in Finland and popular tourist attraction.
Founded: 1967 | Location: Helsinki , Finland

Virstantolppa

Virstantolppa is the oldest memorial in Lappeenranta. It stands in the site of remarkable battle in Russo-Swedish war in 1741. Over 4000 men were killed or injured in the battle on 23th August 1741 where Russian army conquered Lappeenranta. The battle was one the bloodiest in time. Two Swedish commanders were executed in Stockholm afterwards because of serious defeat.The memorial was erected originally in 1818 and enhance ...
Founded: 1818 | Location: Satama, Finland

The Memorial of Kostianvirta Battle

Kostianvirta battle was part of the Great Northern War (1700-1721). Russian army invaded to Finland in 1713 because the major Swedish army was fighting in central Europe. On October 1713, Finnish army under General Carl Gustaf Armfeldt had set the defence line to Kostianvirta river. When Russians attacked, Armfedlt’s 3,400 men first succesfully prevented 15,000 Russians to cross Kostianvirta.On October 6, Russians m ...
Founded: 1713 (the monument in 1906) | Location: Pälkäne, Finland

Jaakko Ilkka Statue

Jaakko Ilkka (1545-1597) was a Finnish yeoman and trader. He is remembered for leading the Cudgel War, a peasant uprising in the kingdom of Sweden against exploitation by nobility and military. At its end, and the peasants' defeat on January 1–2, 1597, Ilkka escaped, but was soon recaptured and executed for his part in the fighting. Jaakko Ilkka was executed in Kyrönjoki and his body was brought near Ilmajo ...
Founded: 1924 | Location: Ilmajoki, Finland

Mannerheim Statue

The statue of Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim (1867-1951), Marshal of Finland, was made by the sculptor Evert Porila in 1939. The statue is located at the hill, where Mannerheim watched the occupation of Tampere in the Finnish Civil War (1918). He was commander of the white army, which occupied Tampere from red guards after the bloody battle .The statue was originally planned to be situated in the centre of Tampere, but the S ...
Founded: 1939-1956 | Location: Tampere, Finland

Napue Battle Monument

The battle of Napue (in Isokyrö) in between a Swedish and a Russian army, as part of the Great Northern War (1714). The Swedish force, consisting almost entirely of Finnish troops, was destroyed by the numerically superior Russian force. As a result, all of Finland сame under Russian military occupation for the rest of the war, a period of hardship known in Finland as the Greater Wrath. The memorial was erected ...
Founded: 1920 | Location: Storkyro, Finland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.