Havis Amanda is a nude female statue sculpted by Ville Vallgren (1855-1940). He made it 1906 in Paris, but was not erected at its present location at the Market Square in Kaartinkaupunki until 1908. Havis Amanda is one of Vallgren's Parisian Art Nouveau works. She is a mermaid who stands on seaweed as she rises from the water, with four fish spouting water at her feet and surrounded by four sea lions. She is depicted leaning backwards as if to say goodbye to her element. Vallgren's intention was to symbolize the rebirth of Helsinki. The height of the statue is 194 centimetres and with the pedestal it stands 5 metres tall. According to Vallgren's letters the model for the statue was a then 19-year-old Parisian lady, Marcelle Delquini.

Havis Amanda is the most popular statue in Helsinki. Every year on 30th of April it serves as a centrepiece for the celebrations. Students of the local universities put a cap on the statue on an elaborate ceremony.

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Details

Founded: 1906 (erected 1908)
Category: Statues in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

AD_X (2 years ago)
Good to see.if visiting
Jan Herranen (2 years ago)
A must see attraction. The lady that rose from the sea
Pangfua Her (2 years ago)
Visited Helsinki in December and they have the Christmas market set up here during the holiday season. It's lovely!
Lisanne Welch (2 years ago)
Really pretty statue, controversial in it's day, look up the wiki. Out in the middle of a town square, easy to get to and a park on one side with a harbor on the other. Definitely recommend.
Gaijin (2 years ago)
One of Vallgren's Parisian Art Nouveau works. It is cast in bronze and sited in a fountain of granite. Havis Amanda is a mermaid who stands on seaweed as she rises from the ocean, with four fish spouting water at her feet and surrounded by four sea lions. Legend has it that a man splashing his face with water from the fountain and shouting three times 'Rakastaa!' (Finnish for 'Love!') increases the man's virility.
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