Mannerheim Statue

Tampere, Finland

The statue of Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim (1867-1951), Marshal of Finland, was made by the sculptor Evert Porila in 1939. The statue is located at the hill, where Mannerheim watched the occupation of Tampere in the Finnish Civil War (1918). He was commander of the white army, which occupied Tampere from red guards after the bloody battle .

The statue was originally planned to be situated in the centre of Tampere, but the Second World War delayed the project. Mannerheim himself also wished not to erect the statue during his lifetime. After his death in 1953 the project was started again, but the public opinion was against the central situation of statue. Finally the statue was situated to the current place in 1956.

C. G. E. Mannerheim causes still quite contradictory emotions in Tampere, because he is remembered as the "slaughterer of Tampere" (lot of local people were killed in the battle of Tampere or executed later in prison camps in 1918). The statue has been damaged by vandalism several times.

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Details

Founded: 1939-1956
Category: Statues in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tero Paukkeri (2 years ago)
Hieno monumentti historiallisella paikalla!
Vuokko Myllynen (2 years ago)
Komeat maisemat josta näkyy kaupunkiin asti.
Isaac Witherspone (2 years ago)
Historical place in Tampere.
Matti Autero (2 years ago)
Kivoja raikkaita metsäteitä pitkin koiran kanssa Mannerheimin patsaalle kävelimme noin kilometrin verran. Tie oli selvästi viitoitettu. Matkan vähetessä tie jyrkkeni. Mäntypuitten lomassa Marski seisoi ylväänä. Perille päästyämme tukevat keltaiset penkit olivat kyllä tarpeen minulle ainakin kiivettyämme jyrkkää polkua. Koira ei ollet moksiskaan. Patsaan juuressa oli seppele sinivalkoisin nauhoin. Kivikorokkeella luki selvitys, että tällä paikalla hän seisoi 1918 tähystäen Tampereen valloituksen vaiheita. Katseen suunnassa oli metsässä aukko, josta kaupungin rakennukset häämöttivät.
Lari Liuhamo (2 years ago)
A historically significant place, with plenty of trees and not too far from the suburbs.
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