Sibelius Monument

Helsinki , Finland

The Sibelius monument was designed by Eila Hiltunen and completed in 1967. It consists of series of more than 600 hollow steel pipes welded together in a wave-like pattern. The purpose of the artist was to capture the essence of the music of Sibelius. The monument weighs 24 tonnes. It’s probably the most well-known abstract sculpture in Finland and popular tourist attraction.

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Details

Founded: 1967
Category: Statues in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vishal Kumar Singh (3 years ago)
Sibelius, said to be a musician of the same name as Beethoven, designed the monument to the organ with great interest. Finland is a land of imagination!
Carlos Moreno (3 years ago)
Weird but awesome Monument close to Helsinki heart. Park is full of nature and beautiful landscape. Must see it
e (3 years ago)
Worth planning a visit to this public park which is centred around this famous monument. It's easily accessible albeit sometimes crowded, however depending on the day, you might be able to see it with less people around. Definitely a photogenic landmark as well
Sandra Garrido (3 years ago)
The Sibelius monument is at a Public garden. It’s a nice place that you can go quickly or stay to relax. Sometimes is crowded.... you just have to wait until everybody goes so that you can see it calmly..!
TK Crowe (3 years ago)
Definitely worth checking out. The park and area near by are very nice. There were vendors selling orange juice and ice cream close by, which was refreshing given the heat. It was very crowded the time I went, in summer, but I waited for a while and was able to get the place mostly to myself. Worth seeing if you make it to Helsinki.
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The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

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The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

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