Top historic sites in Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein National Museum

Liechtenstein National Museum building dated back to 1438. It used to house the princely tavern, custom house and the seat of the government. A work was carried out in 1998-2008 to renovate the building and it was extended towards the mountain slope. The museum displays artifacts about the history, culture and landscape of Liechtenstein in its three buildings and 42 exhibit rooms.
Founded: | Location: Vaduz, Liechtenstein

Vaduz Castle

Vaduz Castle is the palace and official residence of the Prince of Liechtenstein. The castle gave its name to the town of Vaduz, the capital of Liechtenstein, which it overlooks from an adjacent hilltop. The erstwhile owners - presumably also the builders - were the Counts of Werdenberg-Sargans. The Bergfried (keep, 12th century) and parts of the eastern side are the oldest. The tower stands on a piece of ground some 12 x ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Vaduz, Liechtenstein

Vaduz Cathedral

Vaduz Cathedral, or Cathedral of St. Florin was built in 1874 by Friedrich von Schmidt on the site of earlier medieval foundations. Its patron saint is Florinus of Remüs (Florin), a 9th-century saint of the Vinschgau Valley. Prince Franz Joseph II of Liechtenstein and his wife Countess Georgina von Wilczek were both buried in the cathedral in 1989. Elisabeth von Gutmann was buried there too.
Founded: 1874 | Location: Vaduz, Liechtenstein

Gutenberg Castle

Gutenberg Castle is one of the five castles of the Liechtenstein principality and one of two that have survived preserved until the present day. The castle hill has been inhabited since the Neolithic Period. Archeological digs have uncovered several prehistoric artefacts, including the 12cm Mars von Gutenberg figurine, now on display in the Liechtenstein National Museum. Gutenberg Castle began its existence as a medieval ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Balzers, Liechtenstein

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Aarhus Old Town

The Old Town in Aarhus, Denmark (Den Gamle By), is an open-air town museum consisting of 75 historical buildings collected from 20 townships in all parts of the country. In 1914 the museum opened as the world's first open-air museum of its kind, concentrating on town culture rather than village culture, and to this day it remains one of just a few top rated Danish museums outside Copenhagen.

The museum buildings are organized into a small town of chiefly half-timbered structures originally erected between 1550 and the late 19th century in various parts of the country and later moved to Aarhus during the 20th century. In all there are some 27 rooms, chambers or kitchens, 34 workshops, 10 groceries or shops, 5 historical gardens, a post office, a customs office, a school and a theatre.

The town itself is the main attraction but most buildings are open for visitors; rooms are either decorated in the original historical style or organized into larger exhibits of which there are 5 regular with varying themes. There are several groceries, diners and workshops spread throughout the town with museum staff working in the roles of town figures i.e. merchant, blacksmith etc. adding to the illusion of a 'living' town.