Vaduz Cathedral, or Cathedral of St. Florin was built in 1874 by Friedrich von Schmidt on the site of earlier medieval foundations. Its patron saint is Florinus of Remüs (Florin), a 9th-century saint of the Vinschgau Valley. Prince Franz Joseph II of Liechtenstein and his wife Countess Georgina von Wilczek were both buried in the cathedral in 1989. Elisabeth von Gutmann was buried there too.

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Founded: 1874
Category: Religious sites in Liechtenstein

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ivans Borodenoks (3 years ago)
It’s a small but one of the main attraction in Lichtenstein.
Rajeev B (4 years ago)
Nice attraction. Main attraction for tourists
Jose Lejin P J (4 years ago)
Excellent architecture. One of the main attraction in Liechtenstein. You will find many tourists here. Vaduz Cathedral is a main church in Vaduz, Liechtenstein and the center of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vaduz.
Simran Bhullar (4 years ago)
It's a small Cathedral with Gothic style architecture. I liked the glass windows behind the alter and there are very nice sculptures in front of the Cathedral. It is definitely worth a visit, doesn't take much time and has nice views of the mountains from the front.
Steven Smith (4 years ago)
Beautiful neo-gothic church worth a stop inside
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