Monastery of St. Francis Assisi

Zadar, Croatia

The Monastery of St. Francis Assisi in Zadar, along with a church of the same name, was built around 1221. It was consecrated on October 12, 1282 by bishop Lovro Periandar. Throughout the centuries of its history the monastery was the focal point of religious life in the city of Zadar. It was also home to the Franciscan school, precursor to today's University of Zadar. It had rich picture gallery as well as a collection of codices and parchments. In this monastery Saint Jakov of Zadar was first ordained.

The church and monastery lie in the western part of the city. The church is the oldest Gothic church in Dalmatia. The inside is relatively plain. Behind the main altar dating from 1672 lies what was once a shrine and inside choir seats richly decorated with fretwork in gothic style from 1394 by Giacomo da Borgo Sansepolcro.

The sacristy, which follows from the choir area, is important in Croatian history, as in 1358 the Venetian Republic and the Hungarian-Croatian king Louis I signed the Treaty of Zadar in which the Venetians gave up their Dalmatian holdings.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1221
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Владислав Цанков (3 years ago)
The view from the square of the Zagreb Cathedral to the Catholic Church of St. Francis is unique!
Tomislav Turkalj (4 years ago)
It is a monastery "" where one can hear Croatian jal, "" how the Croats died for their state from King Tomislav, well, the December Victims, the Homeland War.
Tin Kojundzic (4 years ago)
In the shadow of the Zagreb Cathedral, among the canonical curia at Kaptol, stands a Franciscan monastery, one of the oldest in Croatia. According to an unconfirmed tradition, its founding is related to the residence of St. Francis in our region. The Franciscans most likely settled in Zagreb before the invasion of the Tatars (1242), perhaps in a former Benedictine monastery. Upon the departure of the Tatars, they built a new church, an early Gothic, preaching, one-nave, court-room with a long bark, as the sanctuary of the present-day church reveals. The Zagreb monastery first belonged to the Hungarian province of Sv. Mary was the center of the Zagreb Custody, which included monasteries in Zagreb, Virovitica, Nasice, Pozega, Kostajnica, and in the place of "Gurbonich", today Kloštar Podravski, from the end of the 14th to the mid-16th centuries. In the mid-17th century, this monastery became central to the Illyrian Custody of Sts. Ladislav, King ”, established in 1655 and soon central in the province of the same name. At the end of the 19th century it was again the seat of the so-called. The Commissariat of the Province of Sts. Ladislava (1897-1899), and since 1900 the seat of the Provinces of the Croatian Franciscan Province. The Franciscans at Kaptol are deeply embedded in the church life of Zagreb. Their church is a religious center for all ages, especially high school and university students, the site of catechumens and a meeting place for Franciscan evangelistic seminars. It is the abode of both our seminary students (1951-1964, again since 1981) and young Franciscans studying at the Theological College in Zagreb. In addition, the Franciscan monastery manages the monthly "Brother Francis" (since 1982) and runs the provincial publishing library of the same name. Since 1900, the provincial administration has been located here.
Boris Khalfin (4 years ago)
A statue of book. Sadly, no translation to English.
o Sosic (7 years ago)
Super
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.