Krka Monastery is the best known monastery of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Croatia and it is officially protected as part of the Krka National Park.

The oldest extant mention of the monastery was in 1345, when it is listed as an endowment of princess Jelena Nemanjić Šubić, half-sister of the Serbian emperor Dušan and wife of Mladen III Šubić Bribirski, Croatian duke of Skradin and Bribir. The Catholic monastery was built on top of a Roman site, and Roman burial catacombs exist beneath a part of the church.

The current church of St. Archangel was erected in 1422 on the location of an earlier Gothic structure. Ottoman Turks devastated the church around 1530 but it was restored on several occasions. Other monastery buildings (18th–19th century), the church, and the bellfry are situated around a rectangular cloister with arcades.

In mid-17th century monks were forced to flee from the Ottomans and found shelter in Zadar, where pope Innocent X in 1655 gave them two churches, that had previously been in possession of Franciscans of the Third Order, named 'Glagolitians' (glagoljaši) . In a subsequent agreement with the Franciscans, the monks declared that they 'live in the service of the Greek Church, the old illyrian language.'

After Operation Storm in 1995 the monastery was looted, but not significantly, as it was protected by the Croatian authorities, abandoned, and the seminary shut down and relocated to Divčibare and, later, Foča. The monks returned in 1998, however, and the seminary reopened in 2001.

The belltower of this monastery was built in the Romanesque style. The complex also includes a chapel of Saint Sava built in the 19th century, under the tutelage of the Serbian Orthodox Bishop of Dalmatia Stefan Knežević, as well as a new building of the seminary and an additional dormitory building. The monastery has its archives and a library with a variety of ancient books and valuable items from the 16th to the 20th century, a collection of wooden icons (St. John the Baptist from the 14th or 15th century, work by the so-called Master of the Tkon Crucifix), silverware and embroideries.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Knud Engmarksgaard (2 years ago)
The guide was very bad. He could not speak English, but talked very fast in Croatien and used one ord two word in English now and than.
Ivy Forninge (2 years ago)
It was nice and butif
Espe Corella (2 years ago)
After reading all about it in the lonely planet, and after a long drive it didn’t meet our expectations so I would not bother for the time wasted to drive there
Goran Bozickovic (2 years ago)
This Serbian Ortodox Church monastery has been a beacon of learning and spirituality in these parts of Dalmatia for hundreds of years. Beautiful setting, scenery and serenity. Well worth a visit.
Sean Feenan (2 years ago)
Superb Monastery tucked away in a beautiful national park in the hills near Knin. Very welcoming to visitors & gorgeous Orthodox Church on site. Well worth a visit if you are in the area... you can buy some candles or other small religious items, chat with the monks & walk around the grounds. You need to pay to enter the national park unless you are going to the Monastery for religious reasons... then its free. You will also see various memorials along the journey commemorating world war 2 for those that love their history....
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