Ribadavia Castle

Ribadavia, Spain

Ribadavia Castle, sitting at what is the unofficial entry point to the old town, has relics dating back as far as the 9th century, but the main structure was erected during the 15th century at the behest of the then Count of Ribadavia. It was abandoned in the 17th century when the counts moved to the palace adjacent to main square of Ribadavia.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.galiciaguide.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Badr Khouzima (15 months ago)
Amazing place to visit. The fort is a great place to walk around and have a drink. The shop sellers are really nice people who would enjoy talking with them while u are at their shops.
antonia (15 months ago)
Old castle with lots of history
Arktix (16 months ago)
I always love visiting the medieval town of Ribadavia
Mark Auchincloss (19 months ago)
Dates back to 11th Century. Was the residence of the Count of Sarmiento from 1375 for various centuries. Worth the entry fee to see superb setting with amazing views. Also to learn about history,the Jewish quarter & tourism in Ribadavia.
Geoff Sims (2 years ago)
The castle is a ruin and is situated on the outskirts of the town. The town itself is a beautiful place with its old streets and stone built houses. There is a nice walk by the river and plenty of places to eat. Well worth a visit
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