Pontevedra Museum

Pontevedra, Spain

The museum's collections are distributed over five different venues: Santo Domingo Convent, Sarmiento Palace, the Castro Monteagudo building, and the García Flórez and Fernández López buildings.

At the 18th-century Castro Monteagudo building you can see collections of archaeology, traditional and civil pre-Roman and Roman precious metalwork (Fernández de la Mora collection), as well as Spanish, Italian and Flemish painting from the 15th-18th centuries. The García Flórez building dates from the 18th century and is joined to the aforementioned, with items in jet, engravings, religious sculptures, Sargadelos earthenware, the office of Admiral Méndez Núñez, and a reproduction of a chamber from the Numancia Frigate, as well as a traditional Galician kitchen. In the same square as the two buildings already mentioned is the Fernández López building, home to the exhibitions of 19th and 20th-century Spanish painting. Next to San Bartolomé Church is the Sarmiento building (18th century), which is dedicated to contemporary Galician painting and temporary exhibitions. In the ruins of the Santo Domingo Convent you can see diverse archaeological remains, such as Romanesque and Gothic capitals, sarcophagi and tombstones.

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Founded: 1929
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julia O (15 months ago)
Good selection of Spanish artists works.
Miriam R. Lampon (21 months ago)
All in one gathering of Gallego & Spanish art/artifacts collections. Very interesting display in one location.
Robert Hamel (2 years ago)
I wish I had had more time to spend there. It was great.
Frank The Realist (2 years ago)
I'm a history buff by nature. This place had so much I appreciated and I learned more than I could have by just reading about it in a book. The city is full of such education. I was beyond impressed. This vacation has been so good despite the rain. Yeah, it's been raining for almost a week but the museum is a wonderful place to visit on a rainy day. I seriously enjoyed it.
Maynard Dodson (2 years ago)
The space is huge and there's a lot of work presented. I didn't find the artwork to be all that incredible but at least there was a lot to look at. The free admission also helped.
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