Monastery of Santa Cristina de Ribas de Sil

Parada de Sil, Spain

The Benedictine monastery of Santa Cristina de Ribas de Sil has its origin in the 10th century. It was first an independent monastery and after the improvements in the 16th century, it remains today as a priory dependent on the monastery of San Esteban de Ribas de Sil. At this time the cloister was improved and the paintings in the church were made. It was one of the most important monasteries of the Ribeira Sacra during the Middle Ages, as it is shown by the vestiges of the roads that are still kept. The monks spent their time cultivating chestnut tree and the vine. The confiscation meant the total abandonment of the place.

It keeps its Romanesque church of the end of the 12th century and beginning of the 13th. It has a Latin cross plan. The front is made up of three semicircular apses, being the central higher than the side apses. The facade is divided into two sections. In the upper, the beautiful openwork rosette stands out. The facade is flared.

The monastery has three simple archivolts decorated with chess motifs on the trim. The decoration of the capitals is mainly vegetal. The tympanum is flat. Inside, the nave is covered with a wooden roof gable which rests on a few pointed arches resting on corbels, which are decorated with geometric shapes and balls. In the central apse the monastery keeps Renaissance wall paintings, from the 16th century. We can see on them the Virgin and San Juan, accompanied by Santo Domingo, San Antonio and St. Thomas. In the upper section, there are Saint Lucia and Santa Barbara. The Romanesque altar is kept in one of the side chapels.

Little remains from the rooms where the monks used to live. In the cloister, only two wings with arches on a continuous base of great sobriety are kept. It was carried out during the improvements of the 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

turismo.ribeirasacra.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marlon Miranda (2 years ago)
Beautiful place! Love the architecture and location is amazing by the river and many lookouts around to enjoy views!
Andy OGrady (2 years ago)
Tranquil and interesting monastery.
Maximilian Pfalzgraf (3 years ago)
Spectacular located little 12th century monastery. Stunning views and incredibly original stone masonry. Marvellous views from high above the beautiful Sil valley. Surrounded by centuries old chestnut trees.
Shawn Canada (3 years ago)
It was more then be expected. So beautiful very old. And it was just 1€ not much at all. It's a must see. In the middle of nowhere.
Dani Valverde (3 years ago)
Inspiring monastery. We visited it in winter and it was spooky!
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